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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can anyone please identify the cichlids, are these Rams???

 

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Look like Balloon Rams, common color variety, not German coloration.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks chromedome52 but do you mind telling me what Balloon Rams are???
 

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monisaab said:
Thanks chromedome52 but do you mind telling me what Balloon Rams are???
Balloon rams are rams that are specifically line bred to select for the spinal deformity that makes them shorter bodied, and rounder than regular rams.
 

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Balloon rams have a deformed spine, makes them look shorter in body length than a normal fish. If you have a longfinned version, they are often called Angel Rams. The deep notch at the caudal peduncle is a common indicator of the deformity.

The spinal deformity is common in many species of fish; the term "Balloon body" was first used for Mollies with this deformity because female Mollies looked like little balloons. However, it dates back to the development of fancy Goldfish, and is likely the real nature of the so-called Bloody Parrot Cichlid, as opposed to the fairy tale of hybridization. It has become more common in various species, such as Platies, Convicts, and Rams. Or, more precisely, it's acceptance as a breed has become more common.
 

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Chromedome52 said:
Balloon rams have a deformed spine, makes them look shorter in body length than a normal fish. If you have a longfinned version, they are often called Angel Rams. The deep notch at the caudal peduncle is a common indicator of the deformity.

The spinal deformity is common in many species of fish; the term "Balloon body" was first used for Mollies with this deformity because female Mollies looked like little balloons. However, it dates back to the development of fancy Goldfish, and is likely the real nature of the so-called Bloody Parrot Cichlid, as opposed to the fairy tale of hybridization. It has become more common in various species, such as Platies, Convicts, and Rams. Or, more precisely, it's acceptance as a breed has become more common.
No reason that Blood Parrots could not be a hybrid with one of the species giving the balloon mutant feature.
What species do you think Blood Parrots were bred from?
After all most of the mollys with this feature are hybrids as are many of the goldfish. :wink:
I could be very wrong but my understanding was the balloon feature was bred into a red hybrid cichlid from a mutant Convict (a hybrid line as are most hobby Convicts).
All the best James
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
thanks guys...

What do you say should I buy them???
 

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monisaab, the Balloon Rams are usually not as hardy as normal fish, as their internal organs are also moved around by the deformity. However, I know quite a few people seem to have no more difficulty with them than with regular common Rams. I really cannot advise you on whether or not to buy, as it comes down to personal taste.

The hybrid story on Bloody Red Parrots was told to discourage amateur breeders. They are nothing more than deformed Red Devils, as the first ones released to the hobby had the same pigmentation as a Red Devil, except that in those fish it was brought out by hormoning them like crazy. Of course, hormoning also made males mostly sterile, and the hybrid story covered this, as well. If you've seen juvenile Blood Parrots, they have the normal barring of citrinellus complex Amphilophus species, and no characteristics of any other genera.

There have been genetic tests done on them at U of Michigan, all showing nothing other than normal A. labiatus, though of course this is far from conclusive because only a limited part of the genes can be tested at this time.

Deformed spines are not the result of hybridization, though many hybrids have utilized such fish to get characteristics desired by the breeder. Deformed convicts do exist, and are often used for the so-called Jellybean Parrots. You can identify them as deformed Pink Cons because they are unstriped at a fairly small size. The fact is that I've bred some of these fish, and while slightly less prolific than standard Cons, they are the same species. Again, stories are told to discourage home breeding.

I have also had deformed spines in a few species of Killifish myself, though I had the good sense to feed them off to predators. Hatching temperature was a factor in some soil spawning Killies, but I had at least two species of plant spawners that also produced bent young. And I did destroy several Inpaichthys fry once that were also so deformed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
thanks again chromedome52...

I won't be buying them... will wait for the normal Rams to show up at the LFS some day...
 
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