Cichlid Fish Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In recently had an Ich outbreak and my appisto cac female died. She didn't have any visible ich on her and the day before she died i didn't notice her as being one of my infected fish(only the tetras and my checkerboard had ich) Which worries me b/c now I'm affraid i may lose my Appisto male, which would be infinitely more upsetting b/c he's such an attractive little orange specimen. I never did see the female eat much(hardly it at all) so it is possible she was just a sickly specimen, however it had managed to live for about 6 weeks without much eating. I've been treating the tank with Maracide and am now bringing the temperature back down from 85 degrees. The Male appisto doesn't have any ich but I noticed has lost a little color around his front body to head. Most his scales are a yellow dull brown coloring but yesterday the area of his temple seemed noticeably paler than the rest of his body. I recently put my airstone back on after having it off in effort to increase the C02 in my tank b/c it is heavily planted and I learned on the plant forum that I would likely not need an airstone running save for at night occasionally. The good news is my appisto has been eating as feverishly as ever and doesn't have any ich. My hope is that the female was sickly and the discoloration near the male's temples are harmless. I apologize for this post being so jumbled but I'm at work and I'm distracted by concern for my appisto! Does anyone have any insight as to anything I should be doing differently or anything at all? Is the female dying automatically a sign of trouble to come for my male? Thank for any responses!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,306 Posts
It could be that the female just wasn't in good shape to start with.

It's just impossible to say. I've never lost a fish to ich, but I do believe that the higher temps (to treat ich) can stress a fragile fish and push them over the edge.

Kim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ok, that is what I suspected also. I had figured the female was finding ways to pick up food when I wasn't lucky but perhaps it was simply a weak fish.. I sure hope so cause that would suck if I lost the male.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
851 Posts
I have 45 pairs of Apistogramma cacatuoides born and raised in the USA. They are breeding and are only 4-1/2 months old.
Most of the Apistos sold these days are imported from the Czech Republic and have been through many hands before you buy them at a shop. Many are run down and are more susceptible to disease than they would normally be. I think the remaining fish is going to die. I'm sure if you hooked up with a local aquarium society you would meet members who are also breeding these fish. They are your best source of quality Apistogramma.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
337 Posts
I totally agree with Apistomaster all of my stock are either wild or tank raised from wild stock by friends and people I talk to on various forums, and I must say that the difference in quality is immediately noticeable. I have spent the money on Czech bred stock before and none of them ever lasted long so I now take what nature is willing to give not what man forces it to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,602 Posts
Most of the Apistos sold these days are imported from the Czech Republic and have been through many hands before you buy them at a shop. Many are run down and are more susceptible to disease than they would normally be.
I absolutely agrea and lost a large number of Czech apisto's abouth 1 or 2 weeks after arrival. They all suffered bloat so they were in poor conditions for a long time. Somehow the males are hardier in my experience. I cured 5 out of 14 fish and they are happy and thriving. I suggest to go with local breed fish and keep away from the SE Asian and Czech fish.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top