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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anybody had any experience with Enantiopus sp. "Kilesa"? I looked at them in a book of mine and they look stunning, and was contemplating getting them? Good fish? hearty? Would they work well with calvus? How about crushed coral as a substrate? etc.

:)
 

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They appreciate a wide open bottom, I'd say that of at least 75 gallons. Being a sand sifter I don't feel the would dig(get it) crushed coral for a substrate.

I have not kept them myself but know someone who has. They will be in my fishroom though when it finished :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
lol, I "dig" it. 8)
 

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I have a group of E. sp. kilesa on crushed coral but I'd have to say they would prefer a sand substrate. My males are jsut beginning to show some color and try to build spawning nests. They struggle with the crushed coral to make the kinds of nests you see in the professional pictures because of the size of the crushed coral particles.

I've only had them a few months. They're in with an adult group of B. tricoti and some young adult Cyp. leptosoma sp. Jumbo Kitumbas and they seem to be doing just fine. I can't say how they'd do with other bottom-dwelling species but would not be confident mixing them with anything other than mid-water and top-dwelling species to avoid conflict and aggression. I would also say that food needs to be able to get to the bottom as the "kilesas" don't get up off the substrate more than a few inches to take food.

You also want to have a relatively large tank footprint with plenty of open space on the substrate to allow the "kilesas" to have sufficient room to forage and breed. I've read that males will build their nests within six inches of each other but my young males seem to be building their nests about 12-16 inches apart.

Good luck if you decide to get them. The males' colors are magnificent and they're really fun to observe interacting as they do. They seem to be in constant motion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
they look like an oustanding fish. Their colors are beautiful. I cant wait to setup my text to put them in. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yeah, I can def see a large 7' or 8' tank in the near future for these guys and a couple of other species! 8)
 

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Not sure you have to go that big with these guys a 5'x2' footprint clear of other fish and rocks is the biggest I have seen recommended for a big unsexed group and folk do OK with 4'x18" footprint if they outnumber the males with females 2 to one or more.
A 7' or 8' though would be awesome!
 

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PGWald said:
I've read that males will build their nests within six inches of each other but my young males seem to be building their nests about 12-16 inches apart.
What size are the nests?

I am thinking of adding some Kelisa to a 150 gallon. If so I plan to have rock work on both ends and leave the middle open. It is a 6 foot tank and I expect that there will be at least 3-4 feet of open sand in the middle. What size of colony would this support?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
wow, thats great! Do they grow fast or slow?
 

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I guess it depends to a large extent on weather you get em ready to breed as it were or have to grow them on. 7"x7" sounds way to small even for a "perfect" group of TB fully grown to adult by someone else, two males and four females long term (surely not room for both males to have a "nest") to me but happy to be proved wrong by photos. :thumb:
 

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stslimited84:

My group is comprised of nine adolescents and the males are just beginning to color up and display. The few nests they have constructed have been about 6-7" in diameter including the turrets on the perimeter. The fish are only about three inches long and they do get bigger as they mature. I expect the males will need larger areas for their nests as they grow. Currently with a 6'x2' footprint and with limited rockwork only on the two ends of the tank, I don't expect the fully grown males will have any difficulty finding sufficient space to construct and defend their nests.
 

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How sensitive are these fish to water conditions? I recall reading elsewhere that they require excellent filtration and frequent water changes... that is, near perfect water quality. Is this the ideal, or a necessity?

I am considering dedicating a 125g for a young group of these to grow out in- but I wonder if they will they require commitment beyond what I might expect for featherfins or tropheus?
 

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In my experience there is no more sensitivity to water conditions for E. sp."kilesa" than for tropheus or featherfins. If you provide the basic nutritional needs, low stress and typical water chemistry for Tanganyikans and keep the nitrates and other bio-contaminants low, you should have success.
 
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