Cichlid Fish Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
729 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,

I was wondering about the natural changes of the Tropheus Duboisi during maturation. At what size/age does the duboisi loose it's spots and does it instantly develop it's stripe and blue face or is that later? I have only seen tiny babies or large adults in stores, are they available in some intermediate size? Also, are there any differences in size or coloration between the males and females?

Thanks in advance,
Carol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
723 Posts
My Duboisi Karilani juveniles start "changing" at about age of five to six months, and the "change" is quite gradual, progressing from "fading" of the spots to gradual appearance of the stripe, both of these occurring simultaneously. The "blue" comes at about 6 months, but sometimes is not so visible depending on what your lighting variables are.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
I would say between 6 months to a year before they have any adult coloration depending on the variant, sometimes longer. With My Maswa's i've noticed that if you have fry in with the adults they will mature quicker. you can see the fry attempting to display their yellow band and trying to "fit in" with the adults. On average i 'd say around 2 1/2" you should be able to see the band showing through and body turning all velvety black. I think the blue head was the last part to change color if memory serves.

Some people are disappointed with the adult coloration, but IMO nothing looks better than a mix of adults and juvies! :fish: :fish: :fish:
There are some variants that will keep their juvenile colors longer, I'm not sure if they are a natural variant or not , I think they are called "starry night duboisi" or something to that tune.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,697 Posts
Typically Males will be about 1/2" bigger in size, and have a more pointed mouth. Females have a more rounded mouth and steeper slope.

The only true way to tell though, is by venting the fish. You do this by looking at the vent under a bright light and its helpful to have a magnifying glass. In fish below 3-3.5" it can be very hard to tell females from males apart, so it is really better to check fish in size over 3.5"

The hole that is closest to the head is the anus. The second hole closes to the tail is the vent. If the vent is the same size as the Anus or more narrow it is male. If the hole is wider or bigger than than the anus it is female.

I have seen also that Maswa seem to color up faster than other duboisi. 6 months to a year is typical, and usually males will color a little faster than females.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top