Cichlid Fish Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When I first set up my peacock/hap tank I was buffering the water to match, at least as close as I could, the ph and hardness of Lake Malawi. For the last few months I've stopped doing that, letting the water get to my tap water levels, PH of around 7.6, and hardness quite a bit lower. Ever since then, the green algae has gotten a bit worse. Could the lower levels be advantageous for the algae, increasing it's growth? Wondering if I should start buffering again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
When I was buffering the KH was around 15-16. Without buffering the KH is around 7-8. A few months ago I started traveling for my job, so that reduced both the frequency of the feeding of the tank and the frequency of water changes. From a 50% water change per week, to about one 50% water change every two weeks. Feedings are now only once or twice Monday through Thursday (not daily, once or twice for that whole time period), and twice a day Friday through Sunday. LIghting period is the same as it has been for the last year (on timers). I didn't notice the increase in green algae until I stopped buffering though. I have been assuming the algae increase was due to the less frequent water changes, but started to wonder if the lack of buffering might be having an impact as well, since I didn't notice the increase until I stopped buffering.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,242 Posts
Particular conditions could favour one type of algae over another but generally the types of algae we encounter in aquariums are usually pretty hardy and will thrive under a variety of conditions. Especially once the algae is taken hold, unlikely hardness or pH will be much of a factor.
Of course a new tank may not have much algae as it takes time to establish. Once it grows and has more vegetation it captures more light and takes more nutrients and continues to grow and reproduce even more. Time is the real factor, and I doubt a different pH or hardness would have changed anything. Water change may or may not slow or inhibit it's growth. Nitrogen is seldom the limiting nutrient in an aquarium though any number of other nutrients could be.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top