Cichlid Fish Forum banner
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,937 Posts
Yes, it is natural and expected in some (many?) Cichlid species that their coloration will fade a bit over time. A lot of this may be attributable to the aging process itself, as hormones will physically diminish in spawning readiness, display characteristics and behaviors, etc.
But.... with that being said, some Cichlid species just get kind of ridiculous in coloration as they age. Cichlids of the Central American Vieja genus are a bit like that. A very vibrant, colorful species!
And another thing to note is this,
MUNICIPAL MAY LOOK PRETTY - BUT MAY NOT BE RIGHT.
This is one I know from personal experience. As the aquarium technician primarily responsible for maintaining an individually kept 'Wet Pet', female Opsanus tau, (Oyster Toadfish) in a 150 gallon saltwater tank at the Virginia Aquarium, I inherited a dull-colored, listless fish. The following problems were addressed
  • Water changes and cleaning maintenance were falling short of requirement.
  • Feeding was not varied in type. That poor Oyster Toadfish had been fed chunked menhaden and squid pieces only - for YEARS!
No wonder that poor girl was a dull, tan/grey color. After implementing changes (some food choices offered at my own expense), she first false-spawned with eggs everywhere (Thanks for the stitches, girlfriend), and then ultimately colored up to a deep brown and black coloration with an actual lavender hue on her back and through her fins. A makeover! She was gorgeous!
So, keep your water quality high. Stress low. And your food choices varied and high in quality.
THAT will keep your little charges colored up their best for you. :)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,937 Posts
Stress?!!! Geeeeze.... those poor Cichlids were living in a state of UNDECLARED WAR in that tank! :oops:
Yikes!
That municipal aquarium didn't even look 'pretty'! (Time for re-stocking and a do-over?)
 
  • Like
Reactions: nzen111
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Top