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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Thought I would start a journal of my new dual tanks that i'm setting up. I decided to go with them after to talking to several on here over getting one 180-220 gallon tank. I started the first part of the stand tonight and just wanted to get it started. I'll be making my own stand and canopy, lighting system and background. Here is a few pictures to get it started:





Any thoughts, just throw them out there.[/img]
 

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Looks like a nice start, are there going to be doors on it and a shelf under the tank? Looking forward to watching the build! :popcorn:
 

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This is great I'm glad your doing this, I just started framing up part of my garage to make a fish/man room(aquariums, flat screen, beer fridge). I have a space that I wanted to put a 6' tank but like the idea of two 6' tanks even better. Please take lots of pics and give lots of details I'm really interested how this turns out.
 

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How are you going to put the bottom tank in this stand? Lower it in from the top before the top tank is placed? That could be inconvenient down the road. Plus the center brace obstructs the view of the tank. I have two 125's on a double stand, I can independently pull either tank out. There is no center brace.
 

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Mcdaphnia said:
How are you going to put the bottom tank in this stand? Lower it in from the top before the top tank is placed? That could be inconvenient down the road. Plus the center brace obstructs the view of the tank. I have two 125's on a double stand, I can independently pull either tank out. There is no center brace.
Can you post a pic of your stand?
 

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Steak Taco said:
Can you post a pic of your stand?
There is an article here with photos.

http://www.cichlid-forum.com/articles/diy_stand2.php

I built five stands -- one 6 foot for two 125's or a 125 and a 150. I built four identical 4 foot stands that hold a 75 on the bottom and either a 75 or 90 on top. the stand design makes it look as if everything is routed together, but most joints were done just by dropping one board lovwer than the other, except for the legs, and there you can use a table saw or even a circular saw to make the needed cuts. These stands were built several years ago but still look brand new with no sagging or loosening typical of the average DIY project.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I think there is a mix up here in what i'm doing hehe. I'm actually building two stands and connecting them side by side to make it look like one 12 foot tank like this:



I'll be finishing up the 2nd stand tomorrow. I'm not going to actually connect them except in the front with the middle 1X2 inch piece. I'm doing that incase down the road I want to separate them I can with no problems. I can't wait to get it up and going.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Went ahead and did the other stand tonight and put them together. These stands are a little taller than the average stand at 40" high. I wanted the stands to bring the tanks up to a height that I can look into the tank standing there and not having to bend down like I did in most tanks I've had before since i'm over 6 foot tall. These will be perfect for that and I should be able to get the plywood next week and get the outside done.

Yes I will have doors on the front of both stands. I'm also going to put a piece of plywood on the top of the stands with a piece of foam. I was thinking of making one sump for both tanks since they will both house Africans. My only concern was if one tank got something in a disease form, that it would spread through the other tank also thru the sump.......what do you think?

 

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I would do one sump and combine the systems. You get a small gain by separating the tanks like you way in that disease isn't jumping from tank to tank. However, the larger you water system is the more 'wiggle room' you have. I think this is the greater gain. I think if two tanks have the same water requirements its always beneficial to tie em together.
 

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Just curious...what is the purpose of those smaller wood pieces that are attached to the vertical studs?

And probably related to that, how did you attach the vertical pieces to the top and bottom frames?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
That is what the purpose of the smaller pieces are for. I know it's a eye sore in looking at it now without the plywood on it. I figured since I had those extra pieces left, might as well use them to connect the pieces instead of buying some braces, these were free :) I also put screws in at 45 degrees all around the corners of every piece also and wood glued everything. These things are like rocks in trying to wiggle them. With the 3/4" plywood around the sides and on the top, these aren't going to move.
 

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I agree with your conclusion especially since the force of the weight on a stand is directed almost 100% downward. However I am surprised no one else has criticized. I would say the only negative of using the wood brace is that your stand may only last 25 years instead of 50 years. lol

When I started making the frame for my stand I didn't like it the first time so I decided to take it apart and redo it. I tried to salvage some of the pieces, but I had used glue and screws all over the place. After taking out the screws most of the pieces that I could rip apart were damaged because the 2x4 would split leaving a glued on piece. And some of the pieces I couldn't even separate because of the glue. And I just used regular Titebond glue. So I am a big believer that screws (as long as they are not drywall screws - a squirrel could break those things) and glue are a pretty tough combination.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I agree boredatwork. But, I did all 3 on this stand. I used the braces, glue and screws all together. I've read a lot over the past few months before I started this project and there is different opinions out there in what is best to use. So, I just decided to go with all 3 and see how it goes. I'm very confident in that it isn't going to move anywhere. The force of the tank is more so in the ends of the tank anyways and that is where most of the support is needed. I did do a little more today and put in the bottom braces that I will connect a piece of plywood on both bottoms to hold my filters and such:



 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Went ahead and put the plywood on today (ahead of schedule). Next week i'll be adding the molding and decoration to make it look nice and pretty. Still deciding on doors.......have a friend that makes cabinet doors for a living and he will make them for me. Going to have to decide on molding and then cater the doors to match really.

And, thanks to craiglist, these are going to now be 135 gallon tanks. I'm picking up a 135 next with with dual overflows and sump, lights, stand (which i'll sale), hood (which i'll sale), heater and pump for some for $300. I couldn't pass it up and can probably turn around and sale the Stand and Hood for $100 and only pay $200 for the tank, lights, sump, pump and heater. Good deal to me.

Give any input that you can...





 

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Lookin good. Are you going to stain the plywood or put a laminate on?
 

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I like the painted with stained trim look and think it would compliment your set up well. If you decide to go with stain all over, I would recommend switching a couple of your front pieces of plywood so that your grains are all facing the same direction. But since you're already considering the former, I think I'd go with that and not just because of the grain, because it looks cool and different.
 

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I would do a laminate
 
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