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i have a 65 gallon tank that had 5 frontosas in it. I come home from work yesterday and 3 of the 5 had died all of a sudden...I live in new orleans and just returned to my home Post-Katrina and have been having issues with my air conditioning. The house has been extremely warm for a few days. When i removed the dead fish, i realized that the tank water was almost bath temperature warm.

Could this increase in temp be the cause for my fish dying?

...the two i managed to save were transfered to a 55 gallon i have in a different room in the house. I know other factors could be the case and i'm going to have a sample f the water checked by a local shop...any help would be appreciated
 

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djsmith1996 said:
i have a 65 gallon tank that had 5 frontosas in it. I come home from work yesterday and 3 of the 5 had died all of a sudden...I live in new orleans and just returned to my home Post-Katrina and have been having issues with my air conditioning. The house has been extremely warm for a few days. When i removed the dead fish, i realized that the tank water was almost bath temperature warm.

Could this increase in temp be the cause for my fish dying?

...the two i managed to save were transfered to a 55 gallon i have in a different room in the house. I know other factors could be the case and i'm going to have a sample f the water checked by a local shop...any help would be appreciated
Very sorry for your loss. Can we have some more info...? When you say "the tank water was almost bath temperature warm" what was the actual temp? When you get your water sample results back, please let us know the results.

Russ

Russ
 

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As long as your temp, is a regular 28,29'c there should be no problem. Warm water kills bugs like white spot and other fungle problems without the use of treatments or chemicals.
 

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First you should check to make sure the tank is cycled. If you have cycled all ready skip to the bottom of the post for some ideas on adding in O2. I have found many people dont understand the cycling process in aquariums and most fish die offs are related to cycling problems. So here it goes:

If you recently (in the last month) set the tank up and put in the fish then that is likely the problem. Buy a master test kit (Api makes a good one for 40 dollars, lasts a long time)get the ones with liquid and test tubes NOT DIPSTICKS, check the levels of ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate. The readings you get should be :
Ammonia 0 ppm
Nitrite 0 ppm
Nitrate Less than 40 ppm ( 10-20 is ideal, lowest you can maintain)

Normal cycling will give you rising levels of ammonia first. Ammonia will spike very high then begin to drop as nitrite levels start to rise and ammonia drops to 0. then the nitrite will spike high and begin to drop as nitrate levels start to rise. Bacteria in your tank feed on the ammonia and nitrite and will "cycle" the tank, nitrate is the only one left in the water and needs to be removed by water changes as there is no bacteria that consumes it.

If you have any readings on ammonia or nitrite then the tank is not cycled, this will cause fish losses. Prevent most or all future fish loss on this tank by doing daily water testing and water changes until the tank is cycled (usually six to eight weeks on average) Most fish loss happens when the tank is switching from ammonia to nitrites. Test the water, do a water change (50 percent likely for first one to get the readings down) then test again to make sure ammonia and nitrite are at lowest possiable readings on chart. Then continue to test daily and do 10 percent water change (or 20 percent if needed) daily to keep the readings low on a daily basis. Watch for large spikes in the readings adjust the amount of water changed during those days. Dont skip water changes, do daily . You can also help your fish cope with the toxins by adding in a over the counter meds such as ammo loc or nitraban , these products will not stop the cycle and switch the ammonia and nitrate to less toxic forms .

If that is not your issue : Make sure your using a good water treatment for chlorine and chloramine removal.

IF your water chemistry is good, just warm , and you can find no other signs of problems (such as bullies, ich, parasites , fungal or bacterial problems ) then you can raise the O2 in your warmer water by lowering the water level in the tank a couple inches and putting a HOB (hang on back filter). The lower water level will produce a waterfall like effect in the tank breaking up the surface and agitating the water which increases the O2 levels in your tank( i am looking at mine right now and i can see 100's of tiny air bubbles on each side of the tank) , you can also add in a nice airstone and pump to produce bubbles (I just use the HOB myself since i like to over filter anyway). Keep us informed of your water testing results.
 
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