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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,
Im in the process of upgrading from my current 80 G to an used 150 G for my fronts.
I've read some posts regarding cycling a tank, but thought that I can get more different opinions on my case.
1) I am currently using 3 Marineland power filters, with Aragonite white sand in my 80G tank. I have some esstablished gravel from the same tank that i removed a couple weeks ago, are they still good with the bacteria? Should I use them to cycle the 150G?
2) Im planning to buy a Fluval FX5 for the 150G, should i start using it right away to cycle the tank? I am thinking to move one of the penguin power filter to the 150 to kick start the cycling.
3) Will that be helpful at all to put an used filter sponge in the 150G?
4) Should I clean the 150G since it has been used? And what's the safest and best way to clean? Any chemical?
5) Do I need to add any ammonia as suggested by some of the posts?

Thanks in advance.
 

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1) are they still good with the bacteria?
Not if it dried out. If it's been kept in an established tank, then it'll still harbor bacteria.

2) Im planning to buy a Fluval FX5 for the 150G, should i start using it right away to cycle the tank? I am thinking to move one of the penguin power filter to the 150 to kick start the cycling.
Put the fluval on the 80 now. Add some media from the penguin to one of the chambers on the fluval. Best to run this a good 4 weeks. Them move both filters even if the penquin filter won't stay on the 150. Run the penguin for 6 weeks or so.

4) Should I clean the 150G since it has been used? And what's the safest and best way to clean? Any chemical?
Just rinse it out with clean water, don't use soap or other cleaners.

5) Do I need to add any ammonia as suggested by some of the posts?
That depends. I assumed you have to put the new one where the old one is, so you're swapping same day. If not, that changes things. Set up the new one and then add some media from the penguin to the fluval. Fishless cycle using ammonia. Also add any gravel or rocks, etc from an established tank, even temporarily, to seed it. Once cycled you can move the fish and you won't need to move the penquin filter as the other filter has enough bacteria to handle the fish load on it's own.

So, depends on your situation exactly how to proceed. What's your timeline and is the 150 going where the 80 currently is?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Prov356,
You are right. The 150 will goto where the 80 is now. So that pretty much give me no time to cycle the 150, right?
What are the options that you mentioned in the other post? Do you mind to share?
I don't have a timeline for the 150, I just got it tonight, and it is sitting in the family room now. I can't believe how heavy it is ...
Thanks for your reply.
 

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The best then is to take some media from an established filter and add it to the new filter now and run the new filter on the 80 for a few weeks. This will seed the new filter. Then do the swap. Use ALL filters on the 150 for 6 weeks even if they're not going to stay. Move as much rocks, etc to the new tank as possible, even if temporary. This will seed the new filter and new tank as much as is possible. Then after the swap, feed sparingly while testing ammonia/nitrite. If you see spikes, do water changes to keep levels under 1ppm and use a detox product like Prime or Ammolock. Spikes, if they occur at all, will be brief and manageable.

If you can't wait a few weeks to get this set up, then add the media to the fluval, do the swap, run all filters on the 150 and follow the other instructions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Tim,
Thanks for the advice. Will try to follow every steps as you said.
Will keep you posted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Tim,
Do you think the 8 **** will be ok to stay in a 10 G tank for a couple days before I move them to the 150?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
got it. thank you sir!
my concern is the size of the tank for the 8 of them :)
 

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If I were to acquire a used tank (and I have acquired more than a few. including leakers) the first thing I would do is bleach it, using a fairly strong bleach/water mix. The bleach helps rid the interior of any organic material and helps clean it. If there was any mineral deposit I would then use vinegar, full strength to soften and remove it. I start all tanks in a sterile condition.
 

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prov356 said:
Depends if they're oscar fry or multi fry. :) Typically, yes, a 10 can handle 8 fry.
I have 20 1" cichlid youths & 15 1/2" cichlid fry in a 20 gallon (Emp 280 & Fluval U2). The nitrates are still low, but I do 50% water changes every 3 days to reduce the phermones and what not in the water to stimulate growth.

So yeah, if you cut it in half, your bioload is fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
BillD said:
If I were to acquire a used tank (and I have acquired more than a few. including leakers) the first thing I would do is bleach it, using a fairly strong bleach/water mix. The bleach helps rid the interior of any organic material and helps clean it. If there was any mineral deposit I would then use vinegar, full strength to soften and remove it. I start all tanks in a sterile condition.
My problem is that the 150g tank is Very Heavy! Is there a good way to clean it without moving it outdoor?
Thank you everyone for your great advice!
 

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It can be cleaned indoors, even where it will finally sit. Fill the tank with bleach and water (a garden hose would be handy here) and let sit. A power head can be run but isn't necessary. After a few hours or overnight, lower the water level to perhaps a half and scrub the interior. I use plastic scrubbies or something similar. Drain the rest of the water when done. Check for missed spots and redo any. If there is any mineral deposit, soak with pure vinegar and let sit; remove deposits with scrubbie. A paper towel soaked in vinegar can be used to hold the vinegar in difficult places. When done, rinse refill, and drain after allowing to sit for a bit. The vinegar will have neuralized the bleach. I use enough bleach to make the water feel a little slippery.
This is a good time to get the outside clean also. I use window cleaner, which can be spayed on a paper towel or cloth, if you are concerned about getting some in the tank. Lots of people don't go to this kind of trouble, although I think it makes it easier, but, I like to start with as clean a tank as possible. Small tanks I run through the dishwasher, with dishwasher detergent.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for the instructions.
But how do you know for sure that the bleach are totally gone?
 

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you can test for chlorine
 

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humsuplou said:
Thanks for the instructions.
But how do you know for sure that the bleach are totally gone?
After draining, refill with fresh water and add a double or even triple dose of dechlor. it'll remove it completely.

My only fear with bleaching tanks in the house is getting the bleach where you don't want it. Be careful with that stuff.
 
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