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Scientific Name: Copadichromis virginalis
Tints and shades Font Rectangle Pattern Monochrome photography
Pronunciation: k
Tints and shades Font Electric blue Symmetry Pattern
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Purple Violet Electric blue Tints and shades Font
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Tints and shades Font Rectangle Pattern Monochrome photography
Common Name(s): Fire-Crest Mloto
Tints and shades Font Rectangle Pattern Monochrome photography
Habitat: Open water and steep sloping sandy habitat along rocky coasts
Tints and shades Font Rectangle Pattern Monochrome photography
Diet: Carnivore
Tints and shades Font Rectangle Pattern Monochrome photography
Gender Differences: Dimorphic
Tints and shades Font Rectangle Pattern Monochrome photography
Breeding: Maternal Mouthbrooder
Tints and shades Font Rectangle Pattern Monochrome photography
Temperament: Mildly Aggressive
Tints and shades Font Rectangle Pattern Monochrome photography
Conspecific Temperament: Mildly Aggressive
Tints and shades Font Rectangle Pattern Monochrome photography
Maximum Size: 5.25"
Tints and shades Font Rectangle Pattern Monochrome photography
Temperature: 78 - 82°F
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pH: 7.8 - 8.6
Tints and shades Font Rectangle Pattern Monochrome photography
Water Hardness: Hard
Tints and shades Font Rectangle Pattern Monochrome photography
Difficulty: 2


Images:

Water Fin Fluid Underwater Purple

Adult male
Photo Credit: Kenji Takahasi


Articles:
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Comments:
This species appears to be very closely related to C. ilesi, both of which can be found at Gome Rock. C. virginalis is a smaller species with larger eyes and a deeper body and caudal peduncle. Males sport a dazzling red band in the dorsal fin. Females are silver. Breeding males build cave craters, using a large, overhanging rock. This rock thus forms a protective wall on one side and a ceiling over the nest. These nests are separated from one another sometimes by as little as a meter. Breeding occurs from August to November in the wild. It is only found inshore during this time.
 
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