Cichlid Fish Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
357 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a bunch of live rock that I'm going to make safe to use in my freshwater tank. The kind of algae it has on it makes it unattractive to sell to another saltwater enthusiast, so I'm just going to use it myself. I'd intended to put it in fresh water for six weeks to let it "re-cure", but suddenly, I find that I don't really have six weeks. Through a happy set of circumstances, I have fish appearing next weekend.

Could I dry the rock for a couple days, then scrub and boil it? Would this make it safe to use? Maybe a little bleachwater dip before the boil? I know they won't have bacteria, I just need them to be safe to use in the tank.

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,323 Posts
I'd boil it for a few hours. It will help to get some of the organic matter(critters) out of the nooks and crannies.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
253 Posts
This is an age old debate, and you really should do your research. Depending on the type of fish your putting in there you are better off not really messing with the live rock. The problem is that even after boiling the rock will leach harmful toxins into your tank for weeks. As all those organisms die they are going to attempt to take your fish with them. That said, Mbuna and other cichlids would prefer a smoother rock that they can pick the algae off of easier. Remember, these fish come from a lake or river, the rocks in these areas have been smoothed with the passage of thousands of years.

IMHO, read the write up in the library on suitability of rocks, go out side your house, find a local river or stream, get some rocks the fish will enjoy!

Here is the awesome article on rocks.
http://www.cichlid-forum.com/articles/rock_metals.php
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
357 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Sadly, I have done my research. Because it's an age-old debate, there's varying opinions on the suitability of live rock for the tank. Most agree, though, that if you cure it for a few weeks, it works out all right, and acts as a buffer. The methods all seem to disagree, though, so I was hoping there was one that'd let me cycle this stuff faster.

I wish I had a local river or stream. They're in short supply in the desert. ;)

In the end, I suppose the answer is that I'm going to have to use other rocks. I hope my apartment complex doesn't mind me borrowing a few...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
253 Posts
Dude, if you live in the desert you should have no problem finding amazing rocks! You'd be surprised what you find if you spend a day out and about looking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
357 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You realize it's 110 here today, right? :) A day outside is like ambling around Hades, asking for rocks for my fish tank!

Still, I'll be able to find something that'll work out just fine, I'm sure. The live rock I have is really pretty, and has terrific shapes, so maybe I'll have a chance to add some of it after I let it leech into a rubbermaid of water for a month or three.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
292 Posts
sell the live rock and get some new rock for your tank. you'll prolly make money in the transaction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
298 Posts
Well, you can look for rocks if you wish, but I know, Arizona is a warm place.But, there is barely any humidity so it is not as bad as florida here... :(

Findsome rocks, or borrow from the apartment place, and take the old "live rock", go ahead,and start soaking it in freshwater.Boil it, scrub it, dip in a bleach solution, boil, scrub, and soak some more, make sure that you scrub it a couple of times,and soak it in fresh water, replacing water everyday. Do this a couple of weeks,or 2 months, and you should be alright.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top