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I have came across a couple of threads about the difficulty of getting caudopunk fry to survive. Care to share your methods or findings with me?
 

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I haven't had any problem with my caudopunk fry whatsoever. My tank is a species only except for the catfish I use for the cleanup crew.

Tank size, with lid - 24 x 18 x 15H = 30 gallons
In tank 30 PPI sponge, corner Mattenfilter style, air driven
Heater - 50W Jager - 79F average
Lighting - overhead shop light
Substrate - 3M Colorquartz, approx. 1" deep
Rocks - One large Feather rock chunk
Plants - a few planted in substrate
Water - I use private well water, pH=7.8, gH=125ppm, kH=200ppm. Water changes of 50% once per week with 1/2 dose of Prime water conditioner in case of water issues
Food - NLS 1mm (perfect size) & 2mm (a bit too large)
Fry food - NLS .5mm Grow
Live food - Blackworms fed a couple times a week. These were very well received and may have contributed to the eventual breeding of the adults
Other fish - I also have three 2" Synodontis petricola in the tank

I purchased 3 juvies in December of 2009 but they were all females. I bought 5 more in June of 2010 and got at least 1 male as they spawned one month later. There were quite a few fry (never counted them) but at least 20 grew to adult size. All fish remained in the same tank until I started selling the juvies at the local fish clubs.

I have heard they won't spawn until all juvies are gone but don't know if that is true. My fish don't seem to like using shells, even the large muffin snail shells. I did add a terra cotta breeding hut recently but they have not spawned again.

I have heard other people suggest that rock piles and crevices are preferred for spawning as they are more of a rock dweller than a shell dweller.

If you have fry, maybe consider adding some Java moss or similar for the young to hide in. I don't know if yours is a species only tank but that may make a difference.

Hope this helps
 

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Mine only spawned in shells, and refused to spawn when the shells were removed.

It's not that it's difficult to get 'any' fry to survive, but that it's difficult to get a high survival rate even when removing the fry. If I removed 60, 30 would survive. They'd seem fine for a day or so, then some would start to die off. But, you can usually get more than you can move once they get going and spawn every few weeks. I removed the shells so mine would stop spawning.

When mine were ready to be done with the current brood, they'd bury the shell. It was a tank with julies and calvus, so fry never survived unless I pulled them.

I'd agree with Deeda, provide plenty of hiding places, so when they're driven off, they can find refuge. Some have reported that adults will eat their own fry if they don't leave the spawning area when they're ready to spawn again. I can't confirm it, but I suspect that my adults ate a lot of their own fry and drove off the rest.
 

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I agree, I never really noticed how many were surviving because when I was raising Caudos the parents would breed so much that I had fry tanks overflowing with fry from several broods.

I think, If you remove, the best thing to do is to getem when they're still reluctant to leave the shell which is a very small window.

When I didn't want them breeding so often I'd just leave a brood in there and they'd protect them rather thsan breed until tankmates ate all the fry.
 
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