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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay so I have the opportunity to purchase a 135 g for $135. It has a drilled hole for an old overflow owner says they use a plug and does not leak. I plan to check it out, can plugs hold securely? What should I look for? I've never dealt with a drilled tank and I would not want 135 gallons on my apartment floor! Do any of you use drilled tanks that have plugs? Have they ever come loose? Looking for some input. Thanks guys
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Point taken, are these usually all a standard size? i have my fish growing out so i have plenty of time to get this right. Just unsure if i should pass, or take the deal and search for an overflow.

I should add, the seller doesnt have an overflow to sell, and says they used a plug while running the tank. Just unsure how reliable that is to use.
 

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rgr4475 said:
I'm sure the plug would be fine, but knowing myself I would be looking behind the tank daily to see if it was leaking. Therefore I would set up a wet/dry so I wouldn't drive myself crazy worrying about a leak.
+1 on the wet/dry
 

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Chunkanese said:
Okay so I have the opportunity to purchase a 135 g for $135. It has a drilled hole for an old overflow owner says they use a plug and does not leak. I plan to check it out, can plugs hold securely? What should I look for? I've never dealt with a drilled tank and I would not want 135 gallons on my apartment floor! Do any of you use drilled tanks that have plugs? Have they ever come loose? Looking for some input. Thanks guys
Of course they can leak, any plumbing can if old or not done properly. I wouldn't pass it up because of a plugged hole even if it was currently leaking. You can redo that if necessary on the cheap. Post pics and we can let you know if it should be redone and how best to do that. Once done right, it can be trusted to not leak.

I'd also seriously consider a sump with wet/dry for a tank this size, but isn't necessary if that's not what you want to get into right now.
 

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Silicone is so much better than it used to be that it is really not a big problem to seal holes now. Caulking used to dry out and leaks would develope over time but with the new silicones, they stay flexible almost forever when they are inside out of the sun.
 

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Silicone does not dry out. I have tanks from the 60s that are still intact, still hold water and have not dried out, even though they have been dry for 10 years in some cases. Silicone was always designed to withstand the elements indoors or out with a life expectancy of 35 years, or more.
 

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Buy it and build yourself a sump! You could put a 55 under the tank and have enough room for a refugium. The refugium could be used for nutrient uptake with plants or raising dwarf shrimp for food.
 

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I recently received a 135 gallon tank as a gift. I've had fish tanks since 1984 but always had a hang on back filter. This 135 gallon that I just got has a built in overflow.

I was discouraged at first and was scared of water overflowing in my house. I started building a sump tank for a wet/dry filter system and bought a CA 4000 water pump, it was all easier than I originally thought.

My tank has been up and running for a week now with 2 AC110 hang on back filters and the wet/dry filter with 1300 gph total of 3 filters on my fish tank. I could do away without the 2 Aquaclear 110 but hey I had those already and so I just put it on anyways. My fishes are healthy and eating like pigs.

I would recommend you to build a wet/dry filter system. Don't rush through it. Take your time and do it right the first time.
 
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