Cichlid Fish Forum banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,082 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am rearranging the stock in my tanks in a way that will free up a 77g (48" x 16" footprint), and am considering doing a tang community with it. If I go that route I might want to stock it around calvus, making their needs a priority. What would make ideal tankmates for Calvus in this size tank?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
465 Posts
I would say go with a community. Like shellies, cyps, gobies, and another rockdweller like julies or brichardi.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,082 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I figured cyps are a good match generally speaking, but recall reading that 4' is not ideal for them. Paracyps (slightly smaller) would be ok then? What would be the minimum recommended number for them to show well? I can get some Paracyprichromis nigripinnis locally from a trusted source (as well as some w/c black, white or yellow calvus).

As for Julies, any particular ones to avoid? (eg: marlieri too big and mean?) Aso, shell dwellers (the adults) won't be seen as a meal by the calvus? (I don't mind if they eat the fry).

Would you put any Synodontis multipunctatus in there? (Note: I ask this question only because my w/c multipunctatus in my Malawi tank are cuckoo-spawning like crazy, and I have a pretty steady supply of them).

The other option I was considering for this tank was to do a Victoria mix. I've never kept vics, but I have plenty of mbuna, and I guess I'm a bit concerned that would soon become "same- old same-old" (some colour, some agression, some dull females - overall rather mbuna-like with different colour schemes...). The tang community tank, on the other hand, is starting to sound like a nice complement to my mixed Malawi tank and my Tropheus tank...

Thanks for the help and advice! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
I like to see Calvus in with Frontosa. Both timid and,,IMe,,,get along GREAT.

Also have kept all male Calvus/Comp/Peacock show tank. :thumb:

AP.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,206 Posts
APII said:
I like to see Calvus in with Frontosa. Both timid and,,IMe,,,get along GREAT.

Also have kept all male Calvus/Comp/Peacock show tank. :thumb:

AP.
My opinion is the OP's tank is too small for frontosa. As it is, frontosa are predators, and sometimes they just end up doing what predators do, and that is eat fish. If you start with small calvus and small frontosa, that is only going to exaggerate the issue. THIS is only one example of what happens when you mix frontosa with fish such as calvus. I heard of the mix working before, but I've heard of it not working many times too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,082 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Fogelhund said:
APII said:
I like to see Calvus in with Frontosa. Both timid and,,IMe,,,get along GREAT.

Also have kept all male Calvus/Comp/Peacock show tank. :thumb:

AP.
My opinion is the OP's tank is too small for frontosa. As it is, frontosa are predators, and sometimes they just end up doing what predators do, and that is eat fish. If you start with small calvus and small frontosa, that is only going to exaggerate the issue. THIS is only one example of what happens when you mix frontosa with fish such as calvus. I heard of the mix working before, but I've heard of it not working many times too.
Although magnificent fish, I have no plans to keep frontosa and would only keep them in a 6' tank, and my two six footers are already committed. In the end here's what I went with. The experienced will likely tell me about two problems right off the bat - I have a 'plan B' (sort of) in both cases...

2 calvus inkspot (2.75" & 3.25")
2 Julidochromis marlieri
2 Neolamprologus brevis
2 Neolamprologus helianthus (uh-oh)
6 Cyprichromis leptosoma jumbo 'Msabala' (uh-oh)

- If the helianthus pair I'll remove the female (and any fry) or give the pair their own 18g tank (is that enough for them?). They're beautiful and I'd like to accomodate them, but not at the expense of the other fish.
- The leptosoma are jumbo and in a 4:2 ratio. My bad on both counts - pulled a rookie 'kid in a candy store' thing. Alternatives for them are put them in my 6' Tropheus tank, or return them (probably the latter - the Troph tank is going so well I hate to mess with it).

Thoughts and experiences welcome! Thanks,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,082 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Can't be 100% sure of course. The calvus were vented for me, and the others were a best guess on the part of the veteran staff (this is a unique outfit - it's a Saturday-only business dealing exclusively in African cichlids, run by people who are themselves dedicated African cichlid keepers - the odds of them getting it right are better than at an lfs anyways).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,206 Posts
The issue with the Jumbo Cyp's is going to be their aggression levels to each other, in a relatively small tank. I doubt they will cause issues for the other fish. If it were my group, I would be aggressive in raising fry, to increase the group numbers in hopes of reducing future aggression. At least if you get 20-30 fry, you have a future group, in case the males do start stressing the females to death in a smaller colony.

The main issue from there, is handling the helianthus, and whether these particular brevis can handle the marlieri or the brevis. If you can, find a way to force the helianthus into a corner of the tank, and block their vision of the rest of the tank. Make sure their territory is clearly defined, and have at least an eight inch space between the next item in the tank after it. "If" that works (and I've seen it work) you might be able to get the marlieri and calvus to coexist in the balance of the tank, but the brevis are going to have to be put on top of the calvus rock pile, where they'll need to deal with the activity of the Cyp's. Not sure how that is going to work out, but it's your best shot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,082 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for the advice! I actually already have it set up that way for the helianthus. I still need to add more rockwork for the rest of the tank. I am up for a bit of a challenge and will see if it can be made to work, but will be ready to act if it doesn't.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Afishionado said:
Thanks for the advice! I actually already have it set up that way for the helianthus. I still need to add more rockwork for the rest of the tank. I am up for a bit of a challenge and will see if it can be made to work, but will be ready to act if it doesn't.
All of this means nothing without pictures :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,082 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Hyperion said:
All of this means nothing without pictures :D
:lol: forthcoming. But I'll admit right now that I chickened out finally - the helianthus are moving to their own tank tonight. Things are 'ok' for the moment, but the helianthus are already bit testy with everyone, and I REALLY want the calvus to do well in this setup. All others are secondary. I've always wanted calvus :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,082 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Well the helianthus are in their own tank. They're not spawning yet, but their persistent nippi-ness seemed to be making the other fish a bit jittery. The community is a much more relaxing mix to watch now.

Here is the current layout of the community tank. I moved out a good amount of the rockwork to put in the heliantus tank, and this is what's left. More needed?


...and some of the inhabitants:


The smaller calvus put a good one over on me. Got home the other day and it was nowhere to be found. After searching in and around the tank frantically, removing all the decor and checking inside the shells still no sign of it. Recalling another recent thread here about calvus 'getting stuck' in shells I observed the shells under a light and found the fish in one of the apple-snail type shells. It had lodged itself so far inside that even under a bright light only the tail of the fish was discernable through the shell wall (these are thick shells). Fearing this fish might actually be stuck I was preparing to try to gingerly break the shell with two pairs of plyers (in tank water) when the fish wriggled out.

That was just a prologue to what the fish pulled on me next... When I was trying to catch the helianthus to move them to their own tank the smaller of the two helianthus darted into the lone conch-type shell. No problem I figured, I'll just move the shell over to the other tank and give it a twirl or two underwater to make sure there is no air trapped inside . When the helianthus emerged from the shell into it's new tank I moved the shell back to the community tank. Later that day, when looking at the community tank, I noticed the smaller calvus was again missing. Still concerned about whether it might be able to get stuck in one of those apple-snail shells I again inspected them under the light. Nothing, no sign of the tail even. I checked the conch shell for good measure under the light. No sign of the fish there either (although it was harder to be sure as it is a really sturdy shell). Ok, remove the deccor again, look around and under the tank, etc. When I got to looking on the side of the tank next to the helianthus tank, who do I notice looking at me innocently from the helianthus tank but the darned calvus I'm searching for! Obviously when I moved the conch shell with the helianthus inside it over the calvus was inside it too, and it snuck out of the shell and hid for awhile without me noticing... I don't name my fish, but I think this one has dibs on 'Houdini'.

On the subject of the helianthus...


...will an 18g (24x12) tank be enough for the pair long-term?
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top