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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
:x My boyfriend thinks we have too many fish. I disagree!
So, in our 75 gallon tank we have 14 fish, 3 cobalt blues, 1 cobalt blue-kenyi mix, 1 OB metriclima, 4 yellow labs, 3 melanochromis cyaneorhabdos and 2 albinos. Buuuut I still want 1 more OB and maybe 2 acei. Would the tank be overly crowded with 3 more fish? Theres minimum aggression in my tank, I have only 2 bullies (the dominant male cyaneorhabdos, whose a real ******* but spends most of his time in his cave, and a really pretty Cobalt blue-Kenyi mix named Kevin :D ). My bf says not to add any new fish to an already established tank u_u but I was going to add them after I change the tank layout anyways.

Any inputs? [/img]
 

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I tend to agree with him, but not because you have too many. You have an unusual mix of fish. If you add more, especially more in unusual numbers, you are going to upset a delicate balance. How long has this tank been set up this way? (people here usually say two years is the amount of time a tank must be the same before you can say your stocking has worked). What is the footprint of your tank?

If you want to have more fish in general, aim to stock harems of 1 male to 4 females of your cobalt blues, yellow labs, melanochromis fishies and get rid of your hybrids (who may or may not be agressive, and thus needs keeping in groups of 1 male to 6 or more females, and who you don't really want breeding anyway), then add one more species in the same ratio. Avoid species who look the same to avoid interbreeding and agression. Seems to me that you might benefit from doing some reading on your fish. Keeping them in pairs is looking for trouble.

Alternatively, you can go towards an all male setup, and remove all duplicate fish, keeping only males. That way you can probably have 18+ males, but wait to hear from someone who knows better about this than me.

Remember that more fish means more water changes.

Also remember that if this tank has only been up for a month or two that it is far too soon to say whether anything is established or not.
 

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It takes at least one year to know whether a mix is working. Especially if any/all of the fish are juveniles when added. Two years is better.

What are your test readings for pH, ammonia, nitrite and nitrate?

And I agree with Nina_b. Pairs and trios don't work well with Malawi because a single male is likely to kill a single female. The more females you have, the better their health will be. I like 1m:4f ratio for mbuna that are not too aggressive.

If you want that much variety you are better off going with a dozen fish in an all-male tank. So get rid of females and duplicates, make sure none of the remaining fish look alike and go for it. I'd make sure to quarantine new fish for 3 weeks before adding them to an existing tank, and it's better to add a group (like 6) so one or a small number of newcomers are not singled out for aggression.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Quick response: As per the weird ratios, I know I wasnt exactly going by the books, but we got the fish a year ago when they were still tiny babies, so it was impossible to tell the gender anyway. We dont have any aggression problems, the hybrid occasionally chases other fish when they enter his cave but never fights them. Not planning on getting rid of him because hes absolutely gorgeous! The melanochromis is the only real bully, and I heard they need ratios of 1 male: 7 female >_> which is a little absurd to me. I'm not really worried about hybrid offspring either because whenever the fish do have babies the little things just get eaten in a matter of hours. So yeah, the fish have been relatively chill so far, no fighting or dead fish yet (1 year). I was more worried about over crowding than anything else.
 

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If you are doing regular water changes, heck go for it. You may want to remove a few fish down the road anyway. Just add juvenile fish, not adults.
 

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I dont think that overcrowding is a problem by adding 3 more fish.

If you think that the risk of upsetting the delicate balance of your tank is worth it, go for it.
Personally, i wouldnt with that kind of stocking.

So, I guess I have to agree with your bf.
As a side note, bfs are always right :p
 
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