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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got four in my 90 that I've had for probably six years now. Just recently I noticed that they were much more active, chasing each other and I thought, maybe they're looking to breed. I don't even know if they're male or female.

Just wondering if anyone has had success breeding them and what worked, and basically any information.
I love those fish. Always busy.

Robin
 

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I had a group (just found out recently they are petricola and not lucipinnis) of five for 5 years and they just started spawning regularly. Never had any random survivors and no success collecting eggs although I didn't try very hard. :x

I think the lucipinnis fry survive better and spawns are bigger.

Unfortunately I recently lost all but one male (plant additive accident) and I'm having a heck of a time finding more.

With mine the gravid females were obvious, looked like they swallowed a marble. Females were bigger even when not gravid.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks DJ.
Just had a 'duh!' moment: I don't know why but I never thought that my petricolas might breed but from what you've just said it sounds like that's exactly what they're doing. I've got four petricolas, one that looks like it swallowed a marble and three that have always been considerably smaller. So sounds like one female and three males.

I'll have to do some reading on them. Do you know what the eggs look like? I've got three very nosey clown loaches in the same tank so I doubt any eggs would survive. . .

Robin
 

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If you have petricola and not lucipinnis...I'll be right there to get some, LOL. The eggs are tiny and translucent, pinhead size.

It is obvious when they actually spawn and when they lay the eggs.

For the spawn, the male curves his body like a "U" around the head of the female. To lay the eggs, the female furiously thrashes forward against the substrate, throwing substrate and scattering eggs everywhere. Once they start this happens several times over the course of an hour or two.

All tank inhabitants, including the parents, then immediately snap up all the eggs. My peacocks used to realize what was going on and lurk nearby waiting for the release.

There are contraptions people use to collect eggs so they don't get eaten. Bowl of marbles covered by an inverted flowerpot. The fish use the pot to spawn and the eggs fall down into the marbles so you can retrieve the bowl.
 
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