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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all,

I was running the mbuna list for a friend of mine the other day and came across an interesting observation. Perhaps this has been discussed before... Do you find that monomorphic species tend to be less aggressive than dimorphic?

Examples abound - L caeruleus, maingano, acei, rusty, m callanios, socolofi, L textilis, ps dolphin etc. Of course the glaring counter-example is the demasoni. However, I find that as a general observation, it seems to hold true. Perhaps that when it is harder for the dominant male to differentiate males from females, it reduces the aggression.

Food for thought? What do you guys think?

Chong
 

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I don't see that at all. I really think it all depends on how you keep them.

Housing them in the right ratios with the right tank mates in the proper size tank is the key.

Kim
 

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CHK said:
I was running the mbuna list for a friend of mine the other day and came across an interesting observation. Perhaps this has been discussed before... Do you find that monomorphic species tend to be less aggressive than dimorphic?
I sort of see that... at least as a very general trend, but it might be because of a numbers game like Cichlidaholic mentions.

Interesting...
 

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ummm Metriaclima Callainos and Estherae(orange male/female) are not very friendly fish. Neither are Lab. sp. Hongis, Neither are mainganos, although for a melano species they aren't too bad. And you already mentioned devil-sonis. Plus you've got all the dimorphic afras which are mellow as well.
 

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socolofi sure arent friendly. but i do think your on to something there.. labs acie and rusty all seem to be non territorial in my tanks. i think that has alot to do with the lesser aggression...
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hi all,

Thanks for your input :)

eoconnor: M estherae to my understanding is dimorphic, with males being blue as the norm in the wild. M callainos, however, is monomorphic and is listed as "mildly aggressive". L "hongi" is dimorphic too....

But I agree with Kim that aggression will heavily vary with stocking levels and tank size. Perhaps this observation may just serve as a loose guideline - just like "Males have more eggspots" 8)

Chong
 
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