Cichlid Fish Forum banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all! I've recently purchased a 72 gallon bowfront and after much back and forth and research I've decided to do an all male peacock tank. I'm brand new to African cichlids as I've only had smaller tanks in the past but finally have the chance to have a beautiful show tank! I am however unsure on which species will go well in the tank together as I have read that there are more timid and more aggressive peacocks. These are the species of peacocks my LFS has:
Strawberry Peacock
Red Peacock
Yellow Peacock
Sulphurhead Peacock
Blue Neon Peacock
Red Jacob Peacock
Electric Blue Peacock
Red Peacock
Ngara Flametail
A few questions I have:
1. Are you able to keep more than one male of the same species? I've read conflicting things.
2. I've read also you don't want any 2 fish that look too similar but I've noticed that a lot of the species are pretty similar. I've also read that you want to overstock your tank (I'm thinking around 15 in my size tank?), so how is this possible if you aren't able to have more than 1 male of the same species or any that look too similar?
3. In one video I watched he suggested buying 3-4 juveniles of each species and once they colour, pick out the best male and rehome the rest. Is this possible in a single tank with multiple species?
Any suggestions/advice would be greatly appreciated.

P.S. A picture of my setup: I currently have 7 giant danios as I am establishing the nitrogen cycle.
 

Attachments

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
40,705 Posts
Your tank is the size of a 55G (48x12 if you measure on the sides and not the middle). So 10 would be max and avoid hybrids like the strawberry as well as "jacob's" like the one on your list. They are larger and more aggressive peacocks so you would want them in a larger tank.

Yes, one red, one yellow and one blue...you are sort of out of peacocks. That is why most people include haps.

From your list I would choose the red, the yellow and the ngara. You might b e able to get away with also stocking the electric blue (marketing name, guessing as to what it really is...does your LFS know?).

I have had blue neon not color with another yellow...since they are mostly yellow when properly colored. The sulphur head is timid and most often does not color in a male tank.

Multiple males of one species can be tried in very large tanks...72" or larger.

You would not want juveniles of different peacock species in the same tank...when you eventually ID the females according to gender, you will not be able to ID them by species making them unsellable and not a fish you should give away. If you got a tank for each species, you could do that. Better off to pay more for guaranteed sexed adults.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
40,705 Posts
With 5 yellow labs and the 4 peacocks you are fairly well stocked. Maybe an electra to complete the tank. Placidochromis electra a.k.a. deep water hap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the advice! I also now see that they also have flavescent, bi-color 500 (red top Lwanda) and ob peacocks. Would any of those be okay with the list above? I really like the flavescent. Also, I like the look of the otopharynx lithobates. Would that hap work in my tank?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
40,705 Posts
Flavescent is usisya, so it worked for me. OB peacocks are hybrids. Isn't your tank full already?

bi-color could work instead of the electric blue peacock, and lwanda is a different fish...lwanda is a jacob a.k.a. jacobfreibergi so skip them in this tank.

Lithobates would be OK instead of the electra if you prefer that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I haven't stocked anything in my tank yet, just have some giant danios that I will rehome before putting in my cichlids. Just want to have an idea of what I want to stock with before going in to buy. So I think my list will be:
Red Peacock x 1
Yellow Peacock x 1
Ngara Flametail Peacock x 1
Flavescent Peacock x 1
Bi-color 500 x 1
Lithobates x 1
Yellow labs x 4
I'm excited to get my first African cichlid tank going!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
40,705 Posts
You want 10 fish. Yellow labs you want five or one. So five peacocks...red, yellow, usisya, ngara, bi-color.

Is your tank cycled?

Make sure you have one or more extra cycled tank(s) and a rehoming plan. Plan for the need to swap out fish over the first 2 years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Okay, maybe I'll drop a peacock for a lithobates and do 5 yellow labs.
I've had the giant danios in the tank for a few weeks for the nitrogen cycle and I've used African cichlid sand substrate and limestone rocks to help with the pH levels. I am going to bring a sample in to my LFS for testing before bringing home any African cichlids.
The purpose of the extra cycled tank would to be used as a "time out" tank for when one is being overly aggressive? Would that be the reason for swapping out fish in the first 2 years? Sorry, I'm brand new to African cichlids. I've also joined a local cichlid club for rehoming purposes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,342 Posts
I've found that time out doesn't work, atleast the few times I've tried it with aggressive fish. The extra tank is more for holding over aggressive fish until they can be rehomed, or to hold fish that is constantly picked on.

The stocking numbers aren't set in stone, having too few can be a problem, but having a fish or 2 over what's been recommended above isn't going to end the world, as long as you stay on top of maintenance. 18 fish have been recommended for a 125, I think at one point I was around 24, but every Friday I drained the tank down to about 6" of water. Of course with more fish, you'll have to do more cleaning, which would be something to take into consideration. You want to keep stocking where it's manageable without becoming a chore.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
40,705 Posts
The bacteria are going to grow to support the bioload and no more. So guesstimate the bioload of your danios, and put only that many africans in your tank. Better to cycle with ammonia so you can measure how fast it is processed and know it is OK to stock all the fish at once.

Agree time out does not work.

Get a test kit so you can test daily for ammonia and nitrites and nitrates at least until your tank is well established (figure daily testing with ammonia and nitrite = 0 for a couple of weeks, and weekly thereafter for several months.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Deeda

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
40,705 Posts
I am still concerned about your cycle. I would take out the danios and test with ammonia before adding fish.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top