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Are these tanks a pain to get up and running without agression and finding out you've got females in your tank?
 

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I have a 180g set up for almost a year now. As juveniles, the male haps can be very hard to determine sex. I got pretty lucky on the real small ones and also bought some larger juveniles that were showing hints of color. The peacocks were a little more easier to determine.

As far as aggression, it's pretty much a coin flip. During their juvenile stage the aggression in my tank wasn't bad at all. Just try not to house 2 of the same species if possible or any two that may look alike. No 2 male hap/peacock tanks are exactly alike so it's really a wait and see. Me, pretty good so far but they are now starting to show more aggression. I had to remove a Placidochromis milomo Super VC-10 cause my Nimbochromis fuscotaeniatus beat him up pretty good. My suggestion is to have a smaller spare tank set up so you can remove aggressive or injuried fish and then give them back to the LFS or sell them etc... Once you find a good balance, I personally believe they are the best looking African cichlids and worth the trial and error. Good luck.
 

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As long as you are ready and willing to remove fish, even your favorite one, it's not as painful. I think it's more of a pain if you are not prepared for it.
 

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Ditto the previous comments, especially about the need to be flexible and prepared to remove aggressive or victim specimens. Another (fairly obvious) consideration in the equation is that adding / removing fishes of this type can get really expensive, really fast. So, be prepared to invest money and take losses if you decide to go that route. Finding a balance can be difficult. You may have peace for months only to find, one random day, that someone has no more patience left for one of his tank-mates.
 

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eagl97 said:
Are these tanks a pain to get up and running without agression and finding out you've got females in your tank?
I haven't had that problem since I stocked mine with adults. I know some here recommend against that strategy. It worked for me.

But I offer the following cautions:

1. My tank is large - 135 gallons.

2 I stick with hap species commonly regarded as low on the aggression scale. Nothing from Nimbochromis or other genera of piscavores. I also have avoided certain species from genera otherwise acceptable - no VC-10, for example. I haven't followed this rule with peacocks, though. (I have both a Lemon Jake and a Lawanda.)

3. My biggest fish is a Protomelas spilonotus "Mozambique." He's very peaceful. But I think woould-be troublemakers are intimidated by his size. I'm a definite believer in the theory that a gentle giant keeps aggression in check.

4. I never add a single male to the community. I always add them in groups. And I rearrange the decor when I do so.

5. I have a lot of plastic plants in the tank. Since I rearranged them to form a large clump in the middle of the tank, aggression has been greatly reduced. It cuts off the line of sight for the fish from one end of the tank to the other. The chasee slips past the clump to the other side of the tank and the chaser seldom follows.

6. I do have a 55 set up as a secondary tank. Thus far, I've only had to use it for growout purposes. But I wouldn't hesitated to relocate a bullied male to more hospitable surroundings.
 

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I agree with all of the above replies. My 55gal was a warzone for months. Switching fish from tank to tank was a pain. I lost many fish unexpectedly and it got to the point where I wasn't interested in the hobby much anymore. My 55 has only housed around 4 fish for the last 5months because of this . 2 ob's (who are both holding) 1 blue regal and large one deep water hap. But I'm keeping at it, I just bought a 75 gallon :thumb: Its really hit or miss and I'm still learning alot, although from what I've been told peacocks and haps are a much more peaceful species, anything can happen. Personally I like the fact that the look better as they get older so I'm sticking with them.

Call me crazy but when I switched from gravel to white sand a couple weeks ago my whole tank calmed down and all my fish seem happy and are friendly towards each other. :eek: That's why I got the 75, to try again!
 

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i have only had my tank for 2 months & really haven't had any problems. my sulfurhead was a bully for a while but once i added my eureka red, things calm down.
 

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My worst aggression in my 135 gallon all male tank came when I had too few fish in it. Once I reached about 20 fish, it was difficult for any one individual to be singled out by an aggressor. Today there's some typical chasing, usually between the top two fish.

I did a mix of unsexed juveniles for some species and identified larger males in others. Once they grew and I could tell which was female, it was easy to remove them to another tank during a water change. There's not a lot of rocks in these tanks, so isolating and capturing a fish isn't too bad with two nets.
 

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I have a 100g that i just recently about a week ago put all of my males in, The first fish I had to rehome so far was a Labeotropheus trewavasae, he was keeping my OB peacock in the top corner, now that i have him rehomed all is well again. Being patient and not being partial to any of your fish for the long term goal is key to success.
 

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I did this starting with 2 juvies of each species I wanted. I won't do that again. I ended up with several males, but some I didn't get any, some I got two. Because of the similarities among aulonocara, it was a nightmare trying to ID fish that didn't color up. Heck, there were two fish I thought were females and when I separated them from the main tank I was able to ID them as males. I finally got rid of the last of my females and duplicate males. Now that I have a true all male tank its easier to add new fish b/c the cost isn't too bad with one or two fish at a time. Although, I try to add 2-3 new fish at a time so the new guy doesn't get bullied.
 

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If you do an all male tank - DO NOT introduce fish that are too young to sex!! Chasing around females in a rock-laden tank, especially when you can't really re-home them properly because you won't know what species they are, is insane.

My two cents:

Buy from a reputable breeder when the fish are mature enough to be showing sufficient color to be identifed as male (and also to avoid the hormoned female masquerading as a male; been there/done that)
Stock in batches of 3-5 at a time. (Never just add one fish)
Get one male per species, no species that look similar, and avoid those species known to be more aggressive i.e. jacobfriberghi peacocks
Properly landscape so as to provide both open swimming area and hiding places and sight breaks
Be prepared (as mentioned earlier) to remove the bullies and have a way to "rehome them." Always have a separate hospital/QT/time-out tank if you're going all male.

Finding the magic number of fish and magic combination of fish in an all male tank will take time and patience.

good luck!
 
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