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Sounds like you are on top of the chemistry for this. As mentioned by @sir_keith , stability in your water chemistry will be key. Esp. with the more sensitive Tanganyikan Cichlid species you are interested in keeping.
I can only offer a few things for you to consider. Though I'm sure with a system built out as technical as this one will be, there will be some additional aspects to consider and plan for.
  • Dual water pre-treatment reservoirs. Recommend both reservoirs at 225 to 250 gallons in capacity. Having one in active 'dispenser mode' (25 gallons daily?), while the second reservoir is filling with RO and getting prepared with the dosing recipe for use, makes sense. A system like that could also offer some system redundancy in case of unexpected problems.
  • A third water reservoir. This one at 350 gallon capacity, would be reserved for your monthly, 50% water changes.
  • Make up/evaporation loss water. In these larger capacity aquariums, pure RO water is typically added daily to the system to make up for water evaporation loss. Amounts (in gallons) will vary depending on daily, water evaporation loss rate. That daily make up amount of pure RO water should be accounted for, to maintain water chemistry stability in the system.
Otherwise, this looks like it will be a really nice system once set up and placed in operation. Will require a bit more planning and 'tech' than its previous incarnation, as a Black Water (New World) aquarium system. But the results of the effort, should be worth it. :)
 
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Be careful. The water chemistry of a Tanganyikan Lake aquarium approaches the level of a full marine/salt water aquarium. Black Water themed tanks are much more forgiving in maintenance and water chemistry management. Kept acidic in PH, with very soft water and consistently clean, the dissolved organics are nowhere near as toxic to the fish in a Black Water tank, because the PH is kept so low.
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And no - I am NOT a fan of mixing water chemistry additives directly in the tank of a Tanganyikan themed aquarium. To avoid any water chemistry swings in hardness or PH, the water is almost always carefully pre-mixed first in a separate reservoir, prior to addition into the aquarium (For my own 33 gallon 'long' tank, I utilized a plastic, 44 gallon Rubber Maid trash can for the chore with a Model 7 Mag Drive submersible pump/vinyl hose to transfer the pre-mixed water over). You are going to be assuming quite a bit of risk with just the single 100 gallon reservoir available to support this tank.
Certainly more risk than I would be personally be comfortable with. :oops:
 

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Well then.....
Now THIS, is something that comes up on Cichlid-forum quite a lot,
I would think that many tens of small 4-6 inch fish would just make the tank look messy and not that nice. After all, unlike smaller tanks my tank isn't really designed to be enjoyed by examining the fish up close but instead by sitting back and enjoying it as a large scene collectively.
Best answer? Trust your instincts on this. Because even though a 600 gallon tank DOES change things a bit in the usual games we play as aquarists in stocking schemes with balancing aggression and other problems... compared to the wild - nature itself - your aquarium is actually very small. This same problem comes up just as often in larger, New World stocking schemes. My advice is always,
LESS, IS MORE.
It may help to think of this situation as a bit like art. Where FOCUS on intentional things, can reveal the actual masterpiece within. Let's use some imagination to help out here!
And so, place yourself in the water column of that big African Rift Lake. Somewhere above a clear sandy bottom, near a rocky escarpment (invisible to the life forms around you). A look around would reveal that this little place you have found yourself is NOT densely populated. Fish just swimming and crawling 'willy-nilly' everywhere.
Nope.
But, your attention might be directed at that flash of light and color above the open expanse of sandy bottom.
Featherfin Cichlids!
Impossible to resist - those Cichlids (esp. the displaying males), are eye magnets!
Good: NOW you have established the centerpiece species for your tank. Stock lavishly with them!
And, making your stars that much more visually compelling in the mid to upper levels of the water column, are the 'supporting cast'. Dancing and weaving (warily) about amongst those Featherfin, 'Rock Stars' is the Cypichromis, 'supporting cast'. Smaller and brightly colored - they do not disappoint.
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Looking for details now... your eye will inevitably be drawn to the rocky escarpment. Think small, shy and wary. There are no loudmouth Cichlid clowns or bullies here! You'll see a hint of movement, a possible flash of design and muted color - and that is IT.
The REAL SHOW of your 600 gallon tank should always be about those oh-so-impressive Featherfin Cichlids.
I personally believe that diluting from that focus (as in all larger tanks, where more numbers of the same species are needed - NOT more species), will diminish your aquarium. Cause it to lose focus, and be less visually comprehensible to the viewer.
Go with and emphasize the visual power (represented by the Featherfin Cichlids in this case), and the tank will benefit as a result. :cool:
 
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@sir_keith : still admiring that picture you posted up of the Cyathopharynx furcifer. Always been my favorite looking Tanganyikan Cichlid. And, at over 8 inches in adult-sized length? Whew! That rather dramatic Featherfin species is really something else! :oops:
 

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Be careful with this.
There are NO shortcuts!
Get an API Master Test Kit, and ensure that water in this big aquarium is measuring ZERO Ammonia and Nitrites, with plenty of Nitrate production, before you get ANY of those awesome Cichlids.
Been having way too many problems on C-F lately with people not confirming a complete Cycle of their biological filtration before stocking with new fish.
DON'T be 'That Guy'! You know, the one who rushed into stocking with new fish before his tank was properly cycled, and was really upset about it later.
Be Safe!
 
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