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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys,

I am advising a friend on setting up a series of aquariums in his house. The setup we envision is difficult to implement aesthetically, so I am asking experienced hobbyists on ways to set up tanks of this nature.

Basically, we want to "divide" his floor area between his dining area and his living area with either twin 55g alongside or one 55g flanked by a 29g at each end. This is going to be a display piece, so to speak. He is willing to engage professionals to build the required "stand" and canopy, however, we are not sure how to implement filtration systems inconspicuously so that the set up looks "pretty" from both sides. My knowledge of the available systems out there is also limited, since my own setups are more functional than aesthetic, with sponge filters and power filters.

Does anyone have suggestions or pictures we can use for reference? Thanks!

Chong
 

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Most likely a canister filter underneath with the intake/return hidden in the vals. If you want to have two tanks it's going to be more difficult.
 

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can I ask why 2 tanks?? 1 much bigger tank would look far better as a divider.

as for filtration. having the tank drilled, and putting a weir in on the end nearest the wall, and a large sump in the cabinet beneath

if the sump and standpipes are set up correctly it should be virtually silent.(look at the durso standpipes)

any idea what sort of tank your wanting?? it its planted, consider seeing if you can get a large rimless tank, and then use glassware connected to large canister filters (though It might be possible to work that into the drilling, so there are no pipes on the outside of the tank.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the replies :)

Well, 2 tanks allow a greater variety of fish. But I see your point, one larger tank will also reduce runnings costs opposed to 2 separate tanks for the same total volume. We were thinking of a mbuna/hap setup, so just rocks in the center, no plants with sand substrate.

If I understand you correctly, its to use an overflow in one corner, similar to what the marine tanks have. So... that would flow down to another tank below (sump??) which has the filter media (?) and a motorised pump will pump the water back up? Sorry for my ignorance on these designs.

Thanks,
Chong
 

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yes basically.

If you got a 180g (its a bit bigger, but you'll have more room to do stuff with, plus if you were going to have the 55 plus 29s on the ends, that would have made 6foot anyway) have them fit a weir across the back of one side (I would have it run the width myself)

you then make a big rock pile leading up to the weir and hide it that way, you then leave the centre and other side more or less rock free, (just put a few, to act as spawning sites and to give to sight breaks) and consider planing the end with something like water onion (Crinum thaianum)

this should enable you to have a few medium sized haps and a few peaceful mbuna, and maybe some peacocks as well

as for the sump. if you get a 180, I would try and get as big a sump underneath as possible, just for the extra water volume. if you use a Durso Standpipe, you avoid a lot of the noise by it draining, plus placing a sponge directly on the end of the overflow pipe coming into the sump you should minimise the splashing noise there.
 

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I started the planning for a similar tank a few years ago. If you build the stand and hoo so that they are a bit longet than the aquarium, you can set it up so you have a column of what is essentially a tall cabinet at the end against the wall. All your tubes and stuff can go from under the tank into the hood in this chanel. A quick google search for aquarium room dividers turned up this room divider pics

It may be a bit more elabrate than you are planning, but it gives the general idea.

There are also tank that are made to be islands, where the weir for the overflow is in the center of the tank. The plumbing and electrical can go up to the hood throught the center column. Either hiding the colum with plants or rocks is very comon. Then you could have a 360 view.
Center Overflow
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks guys! Really helped.

I think I am getting a clearer picture of what is needed. Next up will be decisions on the stocking. Thats gonna be exciting. :thumb:
 

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When placing a room divider tank it is important to know which way the floor joists are running. The tank should be setup perpendicular to the joists and not parallel otherwise the floor can start to sag. That can lead to greater problems. Of course this doesn't pertain to rooms with concrete floors.

Water weighs 8.33lbs per gallon, plus the weight of the tank, and the weight of the stand/canopy. All of this needs to be taken into consideration.

If the only way to setup the room divider tank is to be parallel to the joists you will need to add vertical support beams from the room below.

:fish:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
That is a good point - will consult builders on the structural stuff.

I think we have decided to go with a 6 ft 180 gallon. What kind of filtration is recommended? I am thinking of getting canister filters but not sure if canisters will service a volume this large.

Thanks,
Chong
 

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the big Fluval FX5's and Eheim Pro3 are up to the task. however, my choice would be sump filtration if inly to remove all the equipment from the tank.

I currently have a FX5 on my 180, and it doesn't produce enough water movement in there, so I will be adding koralia powerheads as soon as I can afford them

just remember that adds clutter to the tank, and as this is a "show" tank, that wont have a background to hide equipment behind.
 
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