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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I picked up a 125g on kijiji about 4 months ago which came with 2 penguin 350 HOBs. I've been doing weekly water changes keeping all my a/n2/n3 levels in check. About a week ago I added a eheim classic 2217. I did a water change 2 days ago and today my nitrates are right back up to around 50/60ppm. Could this be from adding the new canister? Should I just proceed with more frequent water changes until my readings are back to normal?

Thank you and thanks for all the help so far - loving this site! :)
 

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How much water do you change when you do water changes? With 50-60pmm I would do a 50% water change to get it below 40ppm.

The bioload/nitrate levels depends on what fish you have and how many as well as how much you are feeding.
 

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I would think that adding a filter should would only increase nitrate levels if it had a lot of decomposing food stuck in it. So if it was a used filter perhaps this was the case?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thx dotbomb,

The filter is new, and I usually do 40-50% water changes once a week or so. I have about 35 fish, 2-3 inches each. I have been feeding them quite a bit, maybe its starting to add up. I've never had the nitrates change that drastically 2 days after a water change. I thought maybe it had something to do with the cycling of the new canister? thx again.
 

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Adding a new clean filter will not make a nitrate spike but sometimes we do shoot ourself in the foot. Any possibilities of making other changes to the existing filter situation while adding the new one? Sometimes we can get carried away and while adding a good item, decide to clean up the old as well. That can get into rocking the bio bacteria so much that we loose some. You might want to think over what other changes might have happened. In the meantime, I would skip a feeding or two as getting the water clean again is far more important than them eating.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thx Pfunmo,

I did clean out one of the penguins when I did my water change a cpl days ago, but left the biowheel alone of course. I will do a water change tonight, and hold off on feeding for a day or 2...

Thx guys!
 

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Actually disrupting bacteria wouldn't cause nitrates to spike, just the opposite. If the filter had anything to do with the high nitrates, it would only be because of an increase in bio capacity. But, the filter is not the source of the problem, the high organic load is. You'll need to decrease the organic load by either water changes, substrate vacuuming, less feeding, reduced stock levels, or the rinsing of any organic solids from the mechanical filter pads. Any or all of the above will help keep nitrates down. If your tests are accurate, then it's a sign that some change is needed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Ok, excellent, I'm going to reduce my feedings and do a water change, then watch my water tests carefully, thanks everyone!
 

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Prov is correct. I was thinking of increased nitrite maybe rather than increased nitrates. I stand corrected. Backing off feeding and more clean water is almost always a good way to go until we get a better feel for what happened.
 

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Also might want to check your tap water for nitrates, if you haven't already done so. You didn't say whether you are on city, spring or well water.
 

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In Houston we are having a problem with the chloramines. We dechlorinate and break the bond of the chloramines. We are left with harmless ammonium. Which our biofilters quickley handle BUT then our nitrates go up real quick. :roll:
 
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