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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I would like to set up my 75 gal tank for Lake Tanganyika Species. I have been looking at you tube videos and researching for the last few weeks. I would like to have 1-2 species that are either sand or shell dwellers, and 1-2 species that occupy the middle level of the water column. The pH of my water is 7.4 , the Gh is 180 ppm and Kh is 90 ppm. Any stocking recommendations will be greatly appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
DJRansome said:
I would boost the pH to 7.8 or higher. Take a look at cookie cutter set ups for Lake Tanganyika here.
https://www.cichlid-forum.com/articles/ ... er_75g.php
I will check out the articles you linked thanks
What is the best way to increase the pH? Currently I have an inch of sand for substrate. Is there a substrate I can add on top of the sand to increase the pH.
 

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Cookie cutter setup DJ suggested is a good one there's some good stocking suggestions in there. As to the PH though...Personally I am not a fan of boosting the PH unless it is extremely low. I have a Tang tank (frontosa colony, leleupi and comps) and my Ph is about 7.2-7.4 range and they have all been healthy & happy for years now. Many people will say a certain fish needs a high Ph, but they aren't taking into consideration the majority of fish in the hobby are captive breed on local city water which normally has a Ph of about 7.2-7.4 so that is what they have become use too. When you boost Ph there is just too many things that can fluctuate the Ph IMO. Some people do boost it with buffers and that is fine, but I personally don't and I feel it is just adding a step that could cause issues later if you forget to buffer after a WC or something of that nature. Just my .02 far as that goes for what its worth.
 

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pH from the tap varies from place to place. I buy from vendors that have a higher pH for their Africans. Great idea to check with anyone you buy from to avoid issues. Africans can adapt but I prefer to cater to them when possible.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
DJRansome said:
pH from the tap varies from place to place. I buy from vendors that have a higher pH for their Africans. Great idea to check with anyone you buy from to avoid issues. Africans can adapt but I prefer to cater to them when possible.
So would crushed coral and or aragonite sand be good choices to increase the pH?
The vendors you buy from are they local or online purchases? If online are there vendors you would recommend?
 

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I have had crushed coral and aragonite substrate for over 10 years now...pH has not budged one iota. Add baking soda to get the pH you desire. As Steve C says it is critical to keep this parameter stable as even a change of 0.02 in a day can harm your fish.

We avoid naming vendors in the forums, but if you need a recommendation you can send me a PM. I almost always buy online as part of a group buy. We also have local auctions and serious hobbyists that have good stock.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I would appreciate feedback on the following groups . I will choose one for my 75 gal

TANK 1 set up
Cyprichromis Leptosoma. 10-12
Neolamprologus Leleupi. 2
Altolamprologus 2
Either calvus or compressiceps
Juliochromis. 4-6
Either Marlieri. Or Regani
Synodontis. 2-4

My goal for this set up is fish at multiple levels of the tank, active and various colors.

Can Xenotilapia Papilio be kept with this group?

TANK 2 set up
Tropheus. 12-16
Either Brichardi or Moorii. I would like to pick multiple variations 4 of each
Synodontis. 4
Goby. 2-6. Not sure which one would be best

I read keeping a school of C. Leptosoma helps with aggression . If true I would add these

Any recommendations will be appreciated
 

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Too many species for a 75G.

Think in terms of a tropheus species tank (don't mix). Or if you want a community, then the cyps and 2 rock dwellers plus the 5 synodontis.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
DJRansome said:
Too many species for a 75G.

Think in terms of a tropheus species tank (don't mix). Or if you want a community, then the cyps and 2 rock dwellers plus the 5 synodontis.
To clarify
Tropheus let's say I decide to go with Moorii species. I saw there are a more than a dozen variations of the Mooriis . So can I pick multiple variations of that species? Why are you recommending no other fish with the tropheus

For the community set up are you referring to my TANK 1 set up? The 2 rock dwellers . Do you mean 2 different species 2 of each or just 1 species 2 fish.

There is a web site animal-world that has detailed explanations for fish history , habitats, food, etc. that I use a reference.
For the tropheus they were recommending the Cyps to ease aggression. Any thoughts?

For the fish I listed which are the rock dwellers
 

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I would not agree with the recommendation of cyps with tropheus. You can see the Cichlid-forum 75G cookie cutter for tropheus is a species tank. This is because they are rambunctious and require a large number of tropheus to manage aggression. They also get bloat easily if stressed. You would not mix species of tropheus to avoid cross-breeding and the problem of what to do with hybrid fry...some of the options are unattractive.

For the community, you could do julidochromis and calvus, but then I would not add leleupi. For any of these I would start with 6 unsexed juveniles and plan to end up with a pair of each.

If you are more into variety than natural behavior, you might consider an all-male Malawi tank. It is a challenging tank, but really the most workable option if you want variety.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
DJRansome said:
For the community, you could do julidochromis and calvus, but then I would not add leleupi. For any of these I would start with 6 unsexed juveniles and plan to end up with a pair of each.

If you are more into variety than natural behavior, you might consider an all-male Malawi tank. It is a challenging tank, but really the most workable option if you want variety.
I am no longer considering the tropheus set up. I am not interested in a Malawi tank. I am interested in natural behavior over variety but was hoping for a compromise.
I feel as though I am light years away from understanding stocking recommendations because there is contradiction in some articles presented in the library and what you are recommending. Please understand I want to know the rationale for recommendations not just " this will or won't work". I will be a better fish keeper if I know why I'm housing my fish.
The cookie cutter for 75 gal has some set ups with calvus or compressiceps in a tank with shell dwellers. But the article in the library about calvus and compressiceps states not to keep these fish together because the Altos will possibly eat the Shellie's. So which is correct?

My community tank set up is almost identical to a recommended 40 gal set up by the author of Cyprichromis Leptosoma. The difference is I am considering one of the Alto and he has telmatochromis vittatus listed. Why are you only recommending the Julio and calves?

Can you explain what parameters ( not water) you use when deciding what combos of Lake Tanganyika fish to keep together.
In case I can't purchase all the fish in my "A" list I need to know how to figure substitutes that will work.

Just trying to get better understanding so I can have a tank that will thrive .. Tx
 

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Tall order. Some articles and cookie cutters are better than others...I don't like the first 75G cookie cutter for Tangs at all (because brichardi try to kill everyone when they spawn) for one reason. There was one article about Tang community tanks that I was able to get removed years later because it was SO misleading.

True that calvus will eat your fry...so will every other adult fish. If you want to save fry, remove the fish. Otherwise, it is just as well that the fry get eaten so that your tank does not get overrun. They will not eat the adult shellies...just the fry. Leleupi on the other hand WILL end up killing adult shellies so that is another fact you learn from reading posts by experienced Tang keepers and/or by experience after ignoring the experienced Tang keepers, both of which I have done.

After a time you come to recognize the names of people who author articles and posts and put more faith in some over others. Frustrating for the newbie...it was frustrating for me when I was a newbie as well. BTW I am not suggesting you look MY name at all...there are many Members with more wisdom and experience than me.

Regarding the 40G stocking in the Cyp article, I hope the 40G was 48x12 because cyps are seldom recommended in a tank that is not at least 48" long. The Telmat is more like a shellie than a rock dweller. Also the Telmat does stand up to leleupi better than the more commonly available shellies. Finally in a 48x12 I like one rock dweller and in a 48x18 like yours I find 2 rock dwellers work well.

Unfortunately there are characteristics of the individual species that don't fit into general guidelines, so until you ask about a specific stocking, you may not find out about a problem. Don't assume you can substitute species without exception. That is why cookie-cutters are helpful. The one I was recommending for a 75G with Tanganyikans was that last one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
DJRansome. After a time you come to recognize the names of people who author articles and posts and put more faith in some over others
.

First I appreciate the detailed response to my questions . Right now the only thing more frustrating than figuring this out is watching the Eagles .
Are there members you could recommend for me to look into their posts and articles to speed up the process of me trying to figure out whose info is trustworthy.
My time frame is after the new year.
 

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I have kept cyprichomis (Mid to Top Dwelling) with Enantiopus kilesa (Bottom Dwelling) in a 90 gallon with no problems. Maybe 75 gallons might be pushing the limit on the smaller size of tank. Cyps can at times be quite feisty amongst themselves. Tropheus for sure a species only tank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Still trying to figure out how I want to stock the 75 gal. I am no longer considering the syndodontis.
There are some combinations I am considering and hope to get some feed back.
I like the look of a schooling fish so I want to include either paracyprichromis nigripinnis or Cyprichromis Leptosoma in my final combination. I would also like to include Julidochromis Marlieri and Altolamprolongus Compressiceps. To complete this a group of either multis, ocellatus or cautopunctas.

A fish that also is interesting to me is the Neolamprologus Tretocephus. So would this combo work
Paracyprichromis or Cyprichromis
Julidochromis Marlieri
Neolamprologus Tretocphus
Altolamprolongus compressiceps Shell "Sumbu"
 

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All my Puncs occupy pretty small areas and always on the edge of stones and sand. My Cyps school over open sand males tend to claim vertical rock faces. Julies stay within inches of the rock piles. My Comps seem to be very timid they get very stressed with the Julie's and the Julie's shove them around pretty easy. Given space I'd keep any of those together adding the Puncs last.
 

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180 community
Cyp zonatus
Neolamprologus caudopunctatus
Altolamprologus compressiceps
Julidochromis Transcriptus
Eretmodus cyanostictus
Xenotilapia
Neolamprologus buescheri
Tropheus
Given the territory lots of fish get along. Tropheus give the most grief for me they are extremely boisterous
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Halfcopy said:
All my Puncs occupy pretty small areas and always on the edge of stones and sand. My Cyps school over open sand males tend to claim vertical rock faces. Julies stay within inches of the rock piles. My Comps seem to be very timid they get very stressed with the Julie's and the Julie's shove them around pretty easy. Given space I'd keep any of those together adding the Puncs last.
Any chance you can post a pic of your tank. The cyps schooling over open sand is that in the upper 1/2 of the water column.? Im hoping the cyps occupy the upper water column. Do you have rock/ cave set ups on both sides of the tank? I was hoping if I kept comps and Julio they would occupy different sides of the tank.
Why do you recommend putting the Puncs in last
Your 180 has everything I like but unfortunately I'm going to have to make some decisions keeping the tank to 4 species .
 

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I would be willing to try this, but it would be an experiment. Trets are large and aggressive. I like them too.
A fish that also is interesting to me is the Neolamprologus Tretocephus. So would this combo work
Paracyprichromis or Cyprichromis
Julidochromis Marlieri
Neolamprologus Tretocephalus
Altolamprolongus compressiceps Shell "Sumbu"

For your plan that has juli's and comps, I would choose multifasciatus. They might have a chance to raise fry more than the other species you list.

Cyps use the upper levels. Paracyps are cave dwellers so maybe not as much of an open water schooling effect as the cyps.
 
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