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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So for the past month or so I have been reading article after article and thread after thread.. trying to figure the best methods of building while not going crazy with money.. So here is what I have come up with so far..

This tank will be in a unfinished basement in a corner..I am a little concerned with the cement floor though.. The house is 100 years old and I believe the basement floor may be a little too flimsy for the tanks weight.. So I plan on digging a small 1x1 ft trench and pouring a footing. where the stand will sit directly..

Tank wiill be 62 x62 24 inches.. Stand and tank surround will be contructed out of 2x4's with a pressure treated plate..Inside tank will be lined with 3/4 ply and the outside of tank and stand will be wrapped in either 1/2 ply or possibly some T&G cedar.. Everything will be screwed and glued!!

Being that this is more or less a pond, It will still have some height to it because I really want a sump directly under the tank..The tank will be cornered into the foundation of the house about a foot off the wall.. Small platform level with the top of the finished tank for walking around the back sides of the tank will also be framed in..

Tank will be coated with black pond armor that has already been purchased.. Feel very confident in this product.. Screw holes will be filled with bondo(auto body puty) and corners will have fiberglass mesh inbetween the coats of pond armor for added strength..

I really wanted to keep this project on the cheap side so when it came to glass decisions i realized this would be the more expensive part of the project.. I ended up picking up a 75 gallon tank for 75$ and took it apart.. Going to use the front and back panels as my 2 viewing windows.. So in the end the viewing windows will be 46x18 inches.. Now I have 2 options.. I could center the glass on the 62 inch span and have 8 inches of dead space(non viewing) on each end or I could bring the 2 corners a little closer together and have 10-12 inches on the ends.. Not sure which will look better.. Keep in mind the tank won't be that high and viewing it more liek a pond will be it's main purpose..

Filtration wise.. I plan on going with a sump made out of plywwod and coated with the pond armor..Also considering possibly building a couple tower trickle filters filled with bioballs/scrubbies.. 5ft high x 1 foot wide also made of plywood with a plexiglass front so I could see whats going on.. Don't really want these visible so I might work this into a custom built cabinet/panel with doors on it.. Maybe waterfall the water back in..

As for the sump I have read my fair share of articles on overflows and sumps.. I am confident I could build the sump itself but I really don't understand the reasoning on the overflows on a plywood tank.. How I picture it is I could simply figure out my water line and drill lets say 3-4 inches down and drop a bulkhead in.. let's just say the drain is 3 inches down on the tank = 75 gallons.. If I have a 90 gallon sump shouldn't that be fine? I see alot of overflow systems with open straight pipes that will stop suction incase power goes out.. Would I need something like that on a plywood tank??

K I realize this is a long post but I really just want go over everything and see what you guys think.. Pics will be coming soon so you can all get a better idea on what i'm doing.. Hopefully you all can picture what i got going on here :)
 

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Pics Pics Pics 8) 8) 8)

Glad you're starting your thread stefan88

As for the sump I have read my fair share of articles on overflows and sumps.. I am confident I could build the sump itself but I really don't understand the reasoning on the overflows on a plywood tank.. How I picture it is I could simply figure out my water line and drill lets say 3-4 inches down and drop a bulkhead in.. let's just say the drain is 3 inches down on the tank = 75 gallons.. If I have a 90 gallon sump shouldn't that be fine? I see alot of overflow systems with open straight pipes that will stop suction incase power goes out.. Would I need something like that on a plywood tank??
Not sure I follow you. I think you are referring to running the overflows out the back of the tank and down into the sump. if this is the case what you are proposing will be fine. I'm drilling out the bottom of the tank (my wall is 1.5" thick on the back.) You simply have to realize that all the water above that overflow mark WILL find it's way down that overflow whether you have a sump there or not (or if the sump isn't big enough to handle the water that flows down when power fails)

I hope that explains it
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Here is a picture of what I'm trying to describe..

http://www.kodakgallery.com/imaging-site/services/doc/5411:847678202215/jpeg/BG/async

So for example say the intake for the sump is 4 inches below the water line.. 62x62x4 inches of water = 67 gallons.. If the the sump was 100 gallons I would be ok right? I see alot of open loop syphon drains in plywood tanks.. Why not just drill your intake to the sump at the appropriate water level you wish to drain?
 

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OK.. Now I get it for sure. The piece closest to the arrow dictates the depth. You could just as easily not use it. Likely what happened in this instance is that there was not enough Sump space to deal with the entire 3" so a more shallow depth was obtained.
 
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