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Very, very nice looking tank. We have a similar taste in aquarium decor.

How much work is the upkeep on a tank like that?
 

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Awesome! It always amazes me how slow the fish seem to swim in huge tanks. I suspect a lot of it has to do with the size of the tank relative to the fish, but yours seem unusually relaxed, very nice. I especially like your champ, such great fins.
 

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Beautiful setup... the cabinet and trim as well as the tank itself.

Love the Lichnochromis.

Thanks for posting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks everyone. Upkeep is minimal. The tank is on a drip system that drips 2 gallons per hour of freshwater constantly, with an overflow located in my sump that runs into the drain line of my house. I just feed the fish, keep the glass clean, and change the filter pads periodically.

The fish do tend to grow more quickly in the large tank with the drip system. Most of the fish already were good sized before going into this tank. The frontosa is about 10 inches now, and has probably grown 6 inches in the 18 months he has been this tank.
 

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What a beautiful tank.

Your drip system sounds interesting. How do you deal with chlorine coming in through the drip system? Or are the amounts that small they are not a problem?

Bruce
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
brucem- My local water supply contains chloramines, which makes the drip system more complicated. If I just had chlorine in my water, I could run my water line through a carbon filter to remove the chlorine, then into the tank. With chloramines, a simple carbon filter won't do. For 3-4 years, I used a special catalytic carbon filter (http://www.thefilterguys.biz/chloramine_filters.htm) which could break the chlorine-ammonia bond and remove the chlorine. You are left with water containing ammonia with this setup, and there is no way to remove the ammonia with carbon. I was dripping this ammonia-containing water straight into my tank, and the ammonia level was low enough that it would be processed by my biological filtration before it caused any harm to the fish. This strategy worked well for me, and I still have a couple tanks running on such a drip system. Only downside to this setup is that by adding water containing ammonia, I would never be able to get the nitrate level as low as I could if I was adding water without ammonia. (the end product of ammonia after being processed by my biological filter is nitrate)

About a year ago, I switched this tank over from the carbon filtration to a Chemilizer liquid chemical injector (http://www.hydrosystemsco.com/brands/ch ... -hn55.html) This machine injects a diluted Prime solution directly into my water line supplying the drip before this water enters my tank. So I am then essentially dripping water/Prime solution into my tank, and there is no need for the carbon filtration. I made this change in effort to lower my nitrates (which were running around 20ppm on the carbon system). I was struggling with brown algae in the 375 gallon, and thought that getting my nitrates lower might help. The brown algae did go away, but I'm not sure if it was due to the change in my drip system or just the tank maturing.

That might have been more than you wanted to know, or too confusing of an explanation of my drip system. If you just have chlorine in your water, though, it is very easy to set up.

jbarilow- my lights are T5 high output lights. I have two 4 foot t5's and two 3 foot t5's running during the video. Those lights light up the tank very well, better than it appears in the video in my opinion. I actually have a third row of t5's that I rarely turn on as they really aren't needed.
 
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