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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need to reseal my 33 gallon do i need to remove the plastic bracing and strip the whole thing or is theire another way.
 

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if its just a leak you could possibly get away with just scraping out the silicone lining the inside of the tank with razor blades and then re-sealing it with new silicone. Remember to wait 7 days for it to cure because I rushed mine and had to end up taking it all apart anyways.
 

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My 30 gallon started leaking so I just scraped out all the sealant really well, cleaned it up with some isopropyl and threw a new bead of silicone down on the corners. Left all the bracing on and it doesn't leak now. I've had it filled for about a month now. just waiting for it to cycle so I can throw some real fishies into it. good luck
 

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Are you re-sealing because it's leaking? Or to be on the safe side because it's several years old and happens to be empty?
I always re-seal any used tanks I buy just to be on the safe side, but I don't scrape out any of the old silicone, just clean it real well and make the new silicone bead a little bit bigger than the old one and smooth it down.
If it's leaking because of silicone failure I don't know how comfortable I'd feel scraping out old silicone and trying to put more in. It's the end edges of the glass (where they meet) that hold the tank together. If the basic integrity of the tank is solid I don't think I'd risk that by scraping out any old silicone.
Just my opinion.
 

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ksane said:
I always re-seal any used tanks I buy just to be on the safe side, but I don't scrape out any of the old silicone, just clean it real well and make the new silicone bead a little bit bigger than the old one and smooth it down.
If it's leaking because of silicone failure I don't know how comfortable I'd feel scraping out old silicone and trying to put more in. It's the end edges of the glass (where they meet) that hold the tank together. If the basic integrity of the tank is solid I don't think I'd risk that by scraping out any old silicone.
Just my opinion.
I've always read on this forum to do the exact opposite, that new silicone won't stick well to the old and that the glass surface has to be completely clean. If its silicone failure then all silicone should be replaced and the tank rebuilt or else you'll continue to have problems. Thats just what I've heard from a number of people on here.
 

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If you're re-doing it completely then yes-you have to scrape out the old silicone. But there's no sense in risking the basic integrity of the tank if there's not a silicone failure/leak. The new silicone has stuck fine in my tanks where I"ve just gone over it. You've got to get it very clean though before you do it.
I guess it depends on who you listen to :) Because I've also heard it both ways.
 

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It is absolutely correct that new silicone doesn't stick all that well to old. Scraping the old beads out of the interior is a safe, tried and true, method of repair. You do not need to rmove the top rim, but in some cases it comes off easily and makes the reseal job easier. It is not necessary to remove it. I
It is important to remove all the old silicone from iside the tank. Do not cut into the joint between the glass. When your sure you have removed all the old silicone, get a new blade and go over it all again carefully. This may seem to be overkill, but is cheap insurance. Clean the seam areas with alcohol or acetone, and apply new silicone. If you aren't comfortable with the application and smoothing process, you can mask the areas you don't want silicone to get onto. This will give you nice clean edges, but isn't necessary. Always do a dry run before you start so you save time; less important with smaller tanks, but worthwhile with bigger one.
Most importantly, don't fear the project, as it is really quite simple, although care must be taken with the prep. Almost everyone of my 20 tanks has been resealed or built by me. leakers are often very good deals, if you don't mind the effort of fixing them.
As far as silicone goes, you can use GE Silicone for Windows and Doors, from HD or Canadian Tire, Rona's house brand (says ideal for aquariums right on it) or probably the house brand from Home Hardware. Just be sure you use one that says windows and doors, rather than "kitchen and Bath" or "Tub and Tile" as those will surely have mildewcide in them. Good Luck.
 

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BillD is correct on the way you should reseal the tank. I've resealed many tanks in my time and the first few were just going over the old seal. needless to say they ended up leaking again. I found the best way is to take the old inner seal out and put a new bead down. Now with larger tanks I will do a compleat tear down and rebuild the whole tank.
 

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That's why I said it depends on whether he's re-sealing because of a silicone failure....or just for added insurance. In all honesty I wouldn't even bother re-sealing a tank with silicone failure. It's easier and safer to just go buy another tank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well i went ahead and started to strip it i broke one of the panel's and my drill bit's for drilling hole's in the tank are coming in by mail so i'm going to drill out the existing piece and if it goes smoothly i will replace the glass piece sure it would be about the same price to replace but getting it here is another story (no wheels) so i have a complete re build on my hands.

If i break the other piece of glass during drilling the hole's i won't be to upset about it becuase the tank's already broken and i will toss the whole thing.
 
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