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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I may be adding a 220 gallon to my tank arsenal soon, and was hoping for some stocking opinions.

Two possibilities that occurred to me immediately were either a nice mellow frontosa colony (moba or kitumba), or on the opposite side of the energy spectrum, a huge tropheus colony. I have prior experience with tropheus, and I think I'm leaning in that direction.

There's a video on YouTube of a large tank with what looks like 50 Ikola and 50 Bulu Point tropheus mixed. Really stunning, but my subsequent research suggests that while a large tank can help, there is still a risk of aggression and hybridization between groups...and I'm not willing to wait until fry are 2 inches to learn whether or not I crossed strains.

Should I go with tropheus, I'm almost positive that I want to feature the Ikola, but after seeing that video I find myself wanting a tank mate that could provide some sort of color contrast. I know there are some nice petros out there but their feeding requirements and aggression levels seem to rule them out. Anyone have any other suggestions? Normally I have no problems devoting tanks to a single species, but I feel with a 220 gallon I could be underutilizing the potential options all that space affords.

Thanks for any opinions. Other ideas are welcome, too.

My other tanks include (or will include shortly):
125 - foai Kabogo/microlepidotus Kilila
125 - boops/xeno tembwe II
20L - lamp speciosus
 

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I'm in the same boat. I have a 220G 7'x2'x30" Still not sure what I want in it.

What are your dimensions on your tank?
Gibber's are fun for a while but really most tanks I see with a large group even if they are a nice zaire type are pretty boring. IMO :thumb: :thumb: I just like more movement.

I would go the troph's if thats what you are interested in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yeah the boredom factor is what had me waver on the gibberosa idea. Still, I liked that they are larger fish that would make use of the space...considering I would be able to wait the 4-5 years to grow them out.

The dimensions are 72" long by 24" wide and I believe 31" tall. It's basically an extra tall 180.

Glad I'm not the only one with large tank indecision!
 

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I would go petro's in that tank. Just jam it full of rock 3/4 of the way up and that would be an impressive tank. Throw in a nice troph group too.

Since its a tall tank I think this would look nice with the rocks so high piled. If your worried about the rocks falling just silicon them together.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yeah I thought Ikolas would look sweet with petro sp. moshi yellow, but I read some accounts online that made me question the combo. The two main problems cited were a) that to adequately feed petros, one would end up overfeeding the trophs, and b) that the petro's size and aggression could severely limit the tropheus' breeding activity.

If it could work I'd probably do it in a heartbeat.
 

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I have a six foot 210 that I am probably going to move my Kasakalawe trophs into and hopefully add some Bulu Point Petro's. Right now it houses Kigoma Furcifers, cyp. micros and paracyps. I have to throw in my 2 cents though and say that the Boops / Tembwe II combo sounds like a nightmare (just my opinion of course). :thumb:
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I don't actually have the xenos yet (should be a week or two), but I would separate them from the boops should I observe any signs of interspecific aggression. A very reputable online breeder told me he thinks they'll be fine and even guaranteed the boops wouldn't interfere with xeno fry. I hope so. Do you think the xenos would be better with the foai, or would they have the same problems?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Noddy - sounds like an awesome tank. Do you have prior experience with mixing trophs and petros? Or are you just giving it a shot. I'd love to hear firsthand that the combo can be successful.
 

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Many people keep Petros and Trophs together. I have kept petro Trews with two different Troph groups and currently have a single male Petro sp. yellow Mtoto in each of my 5' 120's (started with a group of 12 in one tank). They totally ignore each other but they will scoop up all the food from the surface of the tank. The Trophs learn how to compete for food and I just drop food in a couple of different spots in the tank. I just reccently lost the last of my Xeno Papilio sunflowers that were in the 210 with the Furcifers. The featherfins might not be aggresive to the xenos but they can't compete for food, and as a result waste away and die (in my case anyway). I have a friend that had a terrible time with Tembwe Xenos and I think they were in with Ruziba Furcifers. When I try my hand with them again, they will either be in with Paracyps, Brieni or all alone.
 

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why not some Tanganyika catfish? or shelldwellers? something different just to accent the tropheus.

Feeding may be an issue, but isn't that the fun part?
 

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How do tropheus do with leleupi? I have a 6ft 125g with 6 frontosa Kitumba and 11 leleupi right now (among other fish). The leleupi are incredibly active, chasing each other all over the bottom, while the mellow fronts just ignore them. I have a really bright orange strain, and it makes a great contrast to the fronts. Just wondering if they'd work in a tropheus tank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
ox - a huge colony of shellies could certainly be interesting with the trophs. I like it.

kris - sounds like a sweet tank. Some might say leleupi and tropheus have different dietary needs, but I fed my colony of Ilangi trophs NLS cichlid formula exclusively and they did great. Another interesting suggestion.
 

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What a nice problem to have. :thumb:

Given the tank is 30" tall, I would not stock Frontosa. My experience has been they do not take advantage of the upper parts of the tank. I had a colony in a 30" tall 150, then moved them to a 24" tall 180 and they and I are much happier. They visibly use more of the tank, and do not miss the upper 6". The problem is that most of the fish that would naturally use the upper part of the tank are natural food for Frontosa.
 

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Given the tank is 30" tall, I would not stock Frontosa. My experience has been they do not take advantage of the upper parts of the tank.
I agree with this, but I just remembered a cool tank I saw on youtube. I couldn't do this because my tank is too small, but they combined zaire frontosas with Benthochromis tricoti (big fish who make great use of the upper portion of the tank). Really stunning!
 

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There are tons of fish that get along with Tropheus in this size of tank.

I have kept with Tropheus with the Tropheus breeding:

Petrochromis ( many types)
Limnotilapia dardenni
Simochromis diagramma
Every type of goby.
C. horei
Julidochromis
Chalinochromis

You can mix tropheus just fine with other fish :) I prefer Tropheus tanks that have other fish in them. It seems to calm the Tropheus down.

Now with that said.... Some Petrochromis can be out right mean but in a 220 there are a few that would do fine.

Trews like mentioned before
Famula
Sp. red bulu
Fasciolatus
Tri-colors

Simochromis can be out right mean.... but very rewarding. They are usually only mean towards each other though and should leave your Tropheus alone for the post part.

All the rest are mixed very easily.

You have a large tank. Your aggression levels with Petros should be minimal if you put enough of them in the tank. The trick is to get a somewhat crowded but balanced tank. Make sure you have a sump to keep up with the bio load petros produce and you should be good to go.
 

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I would vote against petrochromis, purely for aesthetic reasons. I think they can be beautiful fish, but they have the similar shape and behavior as tropheus. They would get lumped into the tropheus school, which in my opinion, would take away from the beauty and purity of the school. I think what you want is a single species tank with a few accent species thrown in. The accent species should offer different behaviors, occupy a different part of the tank, and look completely different.

Like a lot of reef tanks, there should be one thing that really catches your eye from across the room (in your case the tropheus), but after looking longer, you begin to discover all these other little jewels inside.

Think of it like a great work of art. You don't want to cloud your focal point. You want to draw people into the work.
 
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