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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

How would featherfins or xenos fit in a 125g with caudopunks and multies?

I was reading @nt!x's thread on his 125g community and he stocked a lot of fish that are not supposed to work together. Any thoughts? The tank is a year old right?
 

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Sounds like a lot of fighting for bottom space to me and nothing much away from the sand.
125 might work lots of space if they stayed where put. But kind of hard to get multies or caudopunks to stay where put. :wink: Both will use small caves to breed and protect and try to drive fish 12" or so from not just shells, so I guess a very large area should be left open just sand for featherfins or Xenos.

Kind of think you might as well have one tank for the featherfins or Xenos and another for the multies plus the punks. That way you can set up the whole tank the way each likes their tanks set up and get more young. Oh of cause a separate tiny tank for the multies and punks would produce even more young. :wink:
 

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Depends on what your goal is for a tank. Lots of combo's can 'work' but also depends on how you define 'work'. If you put 4-5 species that all will compete for bottom space in one tank, will any of them be doing more than constantly competing for space that will never satisfy any of them? If the goal is just to have a lot of tanganyikans that you like in one tank all swimming around and active, then you'd say it 'worked out'. But, if you want to see the behaviors that they're known for, then you have to give them an opportunity to establish territory and get down to doing what they do.

I've seen pics of and admired @nt!x's tank. He's done really well mixing species and providing territories. But they're not all competing for the same territory and he does a good job of getting the numbers right. And his aquascaping lends itself to providing territory and natural boundaries. He's almost an artist. :thumb:

But, to answer your question, I think mixing xeno's, ffins, multi's and caudo's would result in one chaotic setup. They may all live and swim and eat and even spawn, but I personally don't like these types of setups, not for tanganyikans.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Notice I said "OR" not "AND".

I have never kept xenos or ffins so I do not know the behavior of either. I was thinking along the lines of caudos and multies in the corners and giving the xenos OR featherfins (whichever would be a better fit) the middle of the tank.

I'm taking this tank slow and researching fish. Just trying to get a feel of what my options are.

Looks like it will not work out the way I thought.
 

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Notice I said "OR" not "AND".
Most of my post was responding to the following, not to your specific fish list. James had pretty much answered that. Seemed you were asking why some were so restrictive in their suggestions when others got things to work out.

he stocked a lot of fish that are not supposed to work together. Any thoughts? The tank is a year old right?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yeah the answers were great Prov and James!

The comment about putting in 4-5 species of tangs is what made me believe you may have thought I wanted to add both xenos and ffins, After rereading I think I just misinterpreted.

What has been some of your favorite setups to watch? Prov, your temp. and pulcher tank seems really neat.
 

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Tank of mine I watch most is a 64"x15"x15" Tropheus Ndole tank, just them and a 5 Synodontis lucippinis and a couple of goby cichlids. I tried quite a few other fish in there with em over the years. muties, altolamps, pair of J.transcriptus even Enants and O.ventralis. Dunno maybe just me but found the effect less interesting and messy and removed em. Kind of find keeping fish that would mix together or at least be close to each other in the wild more interesting than mixing habitats and substrate spawners with mouthbrooders.
Second would be a 48"x15"x15" with just Altolamps calvus pair and group of comps 7 and a single shelly pair.
Plenty of interest. But much slower moving. Again had lots of other fish tried in there but removed to other communities inc Cyps and Paracyps. Kind of found the mix not pleasing to my taste and moved those.

Its partly a taste thing, tend to think you like simple set ups (tend to get more breeding success I think) only after trying complicated ones (that are hard to predict and seem quite hit and miss the strangest fish not doing as well as hoped). All good fun.

Tank I am most jealous of is one (about 200g but looks far smaller because of the size of the fish) with just some cracking WC huge Fronts in it. Nothing else. Looks awesome and I could watch it for hours.

Same with Enants. Found the interaction of em with multies and goby cichlids of interest at first. But long term found em more interesting with other sand dwellers or just as a breeding group.

Kind of go my own way these days not too interested in what I can get to work with what. Kind of more interested in setting up tanks where I may see some natural cichlid behaviour.

But saying that I have a 200g that has the most hurendous mix of Tropheus featherfins mbuna big Synos big and small Malawi Haps and Aulonocara, Lethrinops and shellys. Kind of have to have one bad taste tank. :D

All the best James
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for that 24, I am so caught up in making sure I have different species interacting that I am overlooking con-specific behaviors.

If anybody else wants to offer their favorite setup(s) I would love to hear about them.
 

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What has been some of your favorite setups to watch? Prov, your temp. and pulcher tank seems really neat.
I enjoy that one, but if you really want to enjoy temporalis, do a species only and crowd them. I had 48 in a six footer for a while and it was great to watch. Lots of personality in those fish. Every one seems to not only look slightly different, but has it's own personality. Males stake a claim on turf and females, females dig out caves and flirt with males, females bicker with each other, even those within the same harem, males break up fights with females. Sub males look for opportunities. Very under-rated and overlooked fish.

My temporalis, pulcher tank will be more interesting when I can get my temporalis breeders going again. They've re-established themselves on their half, so shouldn't be long. My daffodils are beautiful fish, but not the most interesting I've ever had.

I enjoy my xeno sima, and p. nigripinnis tank a lot. I can get lost in it. Not fast action, more ethereal. This and the enants are probably my favorites to watch.

Enantiopus displaying is a good one, but you have to keep them with docile tankmates. I only have p. brieni with them now. I'm thinking of moving the enants and p. nigripinnis up to my family room 180. I think it'd make a tank that I could watch for extended times.

There are lots of tanganyikans I like, but some tanks I like to sit and watch more than others. But doesn't mean I like the fish less, if that makes sense. Some fish are impressive, but not that interesting to watch for hours.

I like to watch calvus, particularly when my females school around together and interact with the males. Subtle behavior, but interesting.

I like juli's and how they look, but can't say they're all that interesting.

My caudopunk breeders were intesting to watch. Lots of personality in that fish. A group is best so there's interaction within the species. I've seen single males trying to entice a taken female away.

My trophs were more interesting when they were younger. Boring me to tears now. I think I need to split the group and shake things up or something. Or just move them on and let someone else work with them.

I'm finding that I'm not really into the tropheini tribe. Behavior is too repeated and predicatable. I like my petros, but I know what they're going to do. It's kind of like watching a record go round and round on a platter.

I'm enjoying watching my l. ornatipinnis now that they're looking like they're starting to get interested in breeding, and I like to watch my brevis pairs in my office desktop.

All of them are very interesting at times. Sometimes you just have to sit and wait. They can reward you with something you don't normally see.

I like combining two, three species at most, but preferably two regardless of tank size. And as James said, single species tanks can be amazing too. I just don't think tanganyikans display their best when too many species are crowded together. I call it 'Malawi-izing' the tank. If you just want lots of different fish scampering about and color all the time, go with mbuna. I think crowding too many species misses the point. Just me. Although I do have one oddball tank that's collecting a variety of things. Sort of unavoidable. But, I spend little time watching that one.

And I didn't know any of this until I kept them. You've just got to get some fish in the tank. :wink:

More I could tell about what I have, but gotta work tomorrow, so gotta go get some sleep.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Great write up Tim, thats why I annoy you with Pm's so much lol.

I have been kicking around the idea of doing a shell dweller species tank. I would imagine you would see many behaviors not seen in the 20-30g tanks that they are usually kept in. Originally I was thinking Callipterus, but the Temps have been on my want list for a year now. Prov, I would love to see the behaviors you mentioned.

Another thought are featherfins, but are they worth the space? Beyond seeing males display and work on their pits does it get any better?

Lastly, I was thinking of stocking the two 30b and the 125g with fish that I could switch up. That way I could switch fish and try different combos in the 125g.

I am for sure guilty of malawi-izing, I feel like I am missing out on behaviors by not adding more species when truthfully its the reverse. I spend way to much time debating setups lol.

Keep those favorite setups coming!
 

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@ant!1x (hope I spelled that right ) has a nice tank. Good mix of sand dwellers, cave dwellers and open water fish. If you get a lot of sand shifters put rocks in different spots for dividers. they'll spawn but not evryone is going to be happy....lol But....No matter what the situation, males always find a way to chase females :p
 

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Another thought are featherfins, but are they worth the space? Beyond seeing males display and work on their pits does it get any better?
No, I don't think so. You're getting the idea. They build spawning pits and chase others out. Females huddle trying to stay out of the way. That's about the extent of it. Kind of mesmerizing to watch though. Depends what you're looking for in a setup. Impressive fish to look at though, and mine are only half sized and half colored up.

Lastly, I was thinking of stocking the two 30b and the 125g with fish that I could switch up. That way I could switch fish and try different combos in the 125g.
That's a good way. You've just got to get fish and try things out. But, you have to give things a chance.

I spend way to much time debating setups lol.
You? No way! :)

I was thinking Callipterus
Calipterus are interesting and not super aggressive. The shell moving/stealing, and displaying for females and interaction between males is interesting to watch. Temporalis are still better. If I could only keep one tanganyikan, they'd be it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I'm going to get some prices on Temporalis and see if they are an option. I would like to start with 20-30 in the six foot tank. Sounds a l lot like the setup I wanted to try with the Central American fish T. pasiones, but could not find them. I like the idea of small fish in a big tank.

I want to try featherfins, but maybe later when I have more tank space. For right now I'm passing them up.

One thirty breeder is going to hold caudopunks and multies, second one I am not sure of.

I do think about it to much prov, I admit it lol. To be blunt, it sucks to spend a year growing out fish just to not like them, I try to avoid that if I can!
 

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To be blunt, it sucks to spend a year growing out fish just to not like them, I try to avoid that if I can!
Understandable. I have some that once I move them on would never get them again, but I don't regret keeping them once. I don't see how I would have really known if I hadn't kept them. No matter how much reading or youtube video's I watched, you don't really know until you have them. I guess it depends on your goals. I've kept almost 30 species, but have another 30 or so I'd like to keep, so sort of requires me to move things on every 18-24 months or so regardless.

If my temporalis get breeding again, I'll send you a few dozen. If you find them, don't believe what some say that they're rare and don't pay a lot. These guys breed like rabbits and anyone breeding them is going to be overrun with fry. I've seen them way overpriced on aquabid and claims that they're rare, they're not.

I sent a guy in the navy on the west coast my 48 from my six footer at cost of shipping just to find them a new home. There's not a huge demand for them. Not enought 'color', I guess. :roll:
 

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There is no reason you cant do what I have done. The bottom line with furcifers is they need to be the king of the tank. Its not hard to set up your tank to have sight barriers and territories for the species you choose. Everything is so busy breeding in my tank I cant keep up with it. I have sold so many fish out of it to pay for its self over and over. I don't think I would trade my furcifers for anything. They are a large, colorful fish that wont eat every small fish they see. My tank is so full of activity I could watch it for hours. None of the species in my tank compete for space and to me it doesn't seem crowded at all. If you have any questions about what I have done feel free to ask.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Prov,

I wish I would have jumped when I had the chance to get some of your temps. Good thing I did not though, fish took the back burner during the first bit of this semester. I was skipping water changes and even feedings some days. I have a balance again and I am excited to get some Tanganyikans in my tanks.

Everybody agrees with you that I have talked to about these guys breeding like rabbits. Will be interesting to see how they take over the tank. Eventually I may add a Kendalli, loved the one I had until it jumped.

@nt!x,

I love your tank. I have to agree with prov that you have almost an art form in how you balanced territories. My concern would be could I make it work. A lot of money invested to be unsure of the outcome.
 

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@nt!x,

I'd love to hear and see specifics about the species you're keeping, numbers of each, and how you went about defining territories and such. What exactly was your thinking propcesses? I think it'd be good info for all. A full tank video so we could see the interaction would be really nice also.

It definitely can be done with the right species, but it also takes some experience. Too often the ones wanting to crowd species haven't kept them before. I was one of those once.
 
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