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  1. The C.A.R.E.S. Preservation Program
    European Cichlid-Forum members will be glad to know that Aquatis, the largest freshwater aquarium in Europe, has opened its doors this past weekend. Originally envisioned over 15 years ago, the project is finally completed and open to the public, although not all the exhibits are fully stocked...
  2. General Aquaria Discussion
    Nanochromis teugelsi. Photo from publication A new species, Nanochromis teugelsi, from the Kasai River area in DR Congo has been described by Anton Lamboj and Robert Schelly. Published in Ichthyological Exploration of Freshwaters, the article can be found on the Researchgate.net website. From...
  3. General Aquaria Discussion
    Steatocranus gibbiceps. Photo by Dave Hansen Steatocranus gibbiceps is one of a handful of described species in the Steatocranus genus. The genus has been under revision for some time and there is still some confusion of what species are included. S. gibbiceps was first described in 1899...
  4. General Aquaria Discussion
    Teleogramma brichardi. Photo by Dave Hansen A new study looks at the impact the rapid moving waters of the Congo River have on cichlid species. Cichlid species living in fast moving waters tend to have elongated bodies and smaller swim bladders in order to cope with currents. However, a new...
  5. The C.A.R.E.S. Preservation Program
    Tennessee Aquarium River Discovery Hall The Tennessee Aquarium in Chattanooga features many great exhibits including River Giants and the Tennessee River Gallery. There is also the Rivers of the World gallery which includes the Amazon River, Congo River and other rivers in Africa. For those...
  6. General Aquaria Discussion
    Young Lamprologus congoensis. Photo by Dave Hansen Lamprologus congoensis is a rheophile (likes fast moving waters) found in various locations of the Congo River in both the Republic of the Congo and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It thrives in the fast-moving, highly-oxygenated parts of...
  7. General Aquaria Discussion
    Pterochromis congicus. Photo by Greg Steeves A very rare Congo River cichlid, Pterochromis congicus has not had much traction in the hobby. This species is widespread throughout the central Congo River and is often a source of food for the locals. There are several references to the species...
  8. The C.A.R.E.S. Preservation Program
    Congo River. Photo by Bsm15. Smithsonian.com has put out an interesting article about evolution in the worlds deepest river. The Congo River, with its unique characteristics, has created some interesting evolutionary circumstances. With depths of over 700 feet and an average discharge of...
  9. General Aquaria Discussion
    Petrocephalus boboto. Photo by Lavoué S, Sullivan JP. Scientist have discovered two electric fish species in the Congo River that have the ability to produce mild currents. These small charges, which are too small to be felt, are believed to help electrolocate in the dark and also serve as a...
  10. General Aquaria Discussion
    Teleogramma brichardi. Photo by Dave Hansen Teleogramma brichardi is found in the rapids near Kinsuka in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The fast moving waters of the Congo River lead to some unusual evolutionary traits in fish. T. brichardi, like other rheophilic fish, developed a...
  11. General Aquaria Discussion
    Orthochromis stormsi. Photo by Dave Hansen Found in the Congo River system, Orthochromis stormsi is a goby type cichlid from West Africa. It has a small swim bladder and spends most of its life along the bottom of shallow, slow moving waters near the shore. O. stormsi males can reach almost 5"...
  12. Lake Victoria Basin West African Madagascar Asian
    Lamprologus lethops Of all the many different cichlids, there is only one known species that is naturally blind and non-pigmented. The elusive Lamprologus lethops is endemic to the Congo River and can be found in river canyons with depths of over 500 ft. Not much is know about this species but...
  13. The C.A.R.E.S. Preservation Program
    Lamprologus congoensis. AMNH For fans of West African cichlids, specifically from the Congo River, the American Museum of Natural History has a fantastic collection of images. Everything from Hemichromis, Lamprologus, Nanochromis, Steatocranus and more. Not just x-rays of the fish, but live...
  14. The C.A.R.E.S. Preservation Program
    Dr. Melanie Stiassny, Curator-in-Charge of the Department of Ichthyology at the American Museum of Natural History, narrates some of the exploration of the Lower Congo River. The video features Museum scientists on a quest to understand why so many species have evolved in the Lower Congo River.
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