Lake Malawi Species • Melanochromis kaskazini?

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Melanochromis kaskazini?

Postby tsushima » Thu Dec 24, 2020 12:54 am

Is there any reason that these are rare in the states? They aren't too rare in europe and there does seem like there is demand if they are in the states. I might try to source a group, but there isn't too much info on them.
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Re: Melanochromis kaskazini?

Postby Fogelhund » Thu Dec 24, 2020 11:32 am

Mbuna aren't a very valued fish in North America, at least in terms of people don't want to spend money on them. I think it's partly snobbery, as in, it's the beginners cichlid.
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Re: Melanochromis kaskazini?

Postby Idech » Thu Dec 24, 2020 2:28 pm

Fogelhund wrote:Mbuna aren't a very valued fish in North America, at least in terms of people don't want to spend money on them. I think it's partly snobbery, as in, it's the beginners cichlid.


Really ? I’m a beginner but I never felt this snobbery. I didn’t choose Mbunas because they were cheap or easy, but because they are beautiful. Also, since they are more aggressive than other cichlids, are they really so much easier ?

To the OP, I’ve never seen that fish at my cichlid store. Maybe they aren’t bred very much. They look like Mainganos I find, and those are easy to find, at least in my area.
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Re: Melanochromis kaskazini?

Postby tsushima » Thu Dec 24, 2020 4:07 pm

Fogelhund wrote:Mbuna aren't a very valued fish in North America, at least in terms of people don't want to spend money on them. I think it's partly snobbery, as in, it's the beginners cichlid.

Thats pretty sad, they are easy to take care and look good. In addition, many of them are threatened with habitat loss. You have experience with chipokae? I might try a breeding project with those, I do know their aggressive reputation. I might have to do a species only tank for that
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Re: Melanochromis kaskazini?

Postby DJRansome » Thu Dec 24, 2020 7:44 pm

Mbuna are more tolerant of water conditions than some Tangs...especially if you are going to try to raise fry. But they are my favorites regardless.
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Re: Melanochromis kaskazini?

Postby Fogelhund » Fri Dec 25, 2020 2:57 am

tsushima wrote:
Fogelhund wrote:Mbuna aren't a very valued fish in North America, at least in terms of people don't want to spend money on them. I think it's partly snobbery, as in, it's the beginners cichlid.

Thats pretty sad, they are easy to take care and look good. In addition, many of them are threatened with habitat loss. You have experience with chipokae? I might try a breeding project with those, I do know their aggressive reputation. I might have to do a species only tank for that


Yes, I've kept chipokae. They don't really need a species tank, but if you are going to mix them, they do need robust mbuna to be kept with them... the bigger the tank the better too. But then, I don't think I'd keep kaskazini in anything less than a 6ft tank either.
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Re: Melanochromis kaskazini?

Postby tsushima » Fri Dec 25, 2020 10:00 pm

Fogelhund wrote:
tsushima wrote:
Fogelhund wrote:Mbuna aren't a very valued fish in North America, at least in terms of people don't want to spend money on them. I think it's partly snobbery, as in, it's the beginners cichlid.

Thats pretty sad, they are easy to take care and look good. In addition, many of them are threatened with habitat loss. You have experience with chipokae? I might try a breeding project with those, I do know their aggressive reputation. I might have to do a species only tank for that


Yes, I've kept chipokae. They don't really need a species tank, but if you are going to mix them, they do need robust mbuna to be kept with them... the bigger the tank the better too. But then, I don't think I'd keep kaskazini in anything less than a 6ft tank either.

For sure, I will be probably keeping either in a 180. I heard kaskazini need larger actually (over 2m) although I'm not sure how valid this is considering the largest kaskazini gets is 18 cm which is more or less similar to chipokae
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Re: Melanochromis kaskazini?

Postby sir_keith » Sat Dec 26, 2020 2:35 pm

Idech wrote: ...I didn’t choose Mbuna because they were cheap or easy, but because they are beautiful...


You and thousands of other hobbyists worldwide. The noted cichlid author Paul. V. Loiselle wrote the following in his book 'The Cichlid Aquarium' in 1985-

'It is difficult to convey to new cichlid keepers the tremendous impact of the mbuna on all aspects of the tropical fish hobby. These highly modified Malawian haplochromines were so utterly unlike any freshwater aquarium fish then known in their intense coloration and vivacious behavior that stunned hobbyists could only compare them to coral reef fishes. The mbuna conferred upon all cichlids an aura of desirability that contributed significantly to the popularity the family enjoys today. It is a measure of the group's success as ornamental fishes that species extremely rare a decade ago are now regarded as rather commonplace by cichlid enthusiasts, who take for granted their ready availability and low prices.'

Amen. I was fascinated by the Mbuna when they began to arrive in numbers in this country in the 1960's, and they became centerpieces in my fish room. Shortly thereafter, Tanganyikans began to appear in the hobby, fishes that on the whole may have been less colorful (with numerous exceptions), but were considerably more diverse and challenging. I have been keeping Tanganyikans exclusively now for 20+ years, but Mbuna still hold a special place in my heart. Yes, Mbuna are easy to keep and easy to breed, which is why they are widespread and inexpensive, but that takes nothing away from their desirability.

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