Lake Malawi Species • Peacock Cichlid Growth Experiment

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Peacock Cichlid Growth Experiment

Postby samtez » Mon Sep 07, 2020 3:01 pm

Hey guys,

We've all heard it, water changes help fish grow at a faster rate. I cannot stress how many youtube videos I've seen stating this exact claim, how many articles there are online about it, and how much logical sense it makes. However, I have not seen any actual study done on this at all. No photos, videos, actual scientific data, nothing. With that being said, I am taking it upon myself to do so. I plan on raising a group of Peacock cichlid fry, ( I have a few holding females) in two separate 10G tanks. Here is my plan:

1) Strip holding female of fry once I am confident that they are free-swimming.
2) Count the fry that I have and separate half into each 10G tank (say 10 each tank)
3) have the same temperature, filtration, feeding schedule, feeding amount, and try to limit all other external variables
4) Perform 30% daily water changes on one 10G tank and one 30% weekly water change on the other 10G tank
5) Repeat the process for (a month? fry might outgrow 10G before a month) and see how the two fry tanks compare to each other

I would want to document my process either on a forum or make a youtube series about it to once and for all settle the "debate". If anyone else thinks this is a good idea I would love to hear some feedback about my idea. Or if anyone has any changes that they suggest I would love to hear that as well. Also if anyone has a link or an article of this already been done that would be great as I would love to read up on some educational content!

I am also about to start selling fry locally in the San Francisco Bay area if anyone is interested in peacock cichlid fry.
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Re: Peacock Cichlid Growth Experiment

Postby DJRansome » Mon Sep 07, 2020 3:37 pm

I think anyone who has raised fry has done this study, but I recommend you also test the nitrates with each water change if you want to document. More water changes are for the purpose of less nitrates.

I would also do this in 20G long tanks so that the test can last longer than one month. I would go for six months.
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Re: Peacock Cichlid Growth Experiment

Postby samtez » Mon Sep 07, 2020 3:59 pm

I do agree about the nitrates portion and doing tests each water change would be a great variable to add to the study.

The 20G long idea is also something that I would have to sleep on as well as the extended time frame that youre mentioning. I would not want to deter the growth of a subset of fry for that long as I am trying to sell these fast and raise many groups at once and i purely dont have the resources to do so. I will however take it into consideration as it would give better results. Thanks for the reply!
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Re: Peacock Cichlid Growth Experiment

Postby DJRansome » Mon Sep 07, 2020 4:21 pm

Ideally you would sell juveniles at around 2 inches...or 1.5 inches at minimum.

You realize a single peacock clutch can easily be 60 individuals?

You may saturate the market pretty quickly.
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Re: Peacock Cichlid Growth Experiment

Postby sir_keith » Mon Sep 07, 2020 9:43 pm

samtez wrote:Hey guys,

We've all heard it, water changes help fish grow at a faster rate. I cannot stress how many youtube videos I've seen stating this exact claim, how many articles there are online about it, and how much logical sense it makes. However, I have not seen any actual study done on this at all. No photos, videos, actual scientific data, nothing.


If that is the case, you are simply looking in the wrong places. The information you seek will not be in hobbyist magazines or YouTube videos, it will be in the scientific literature. As an entry point into that literature, I suggest you consult a book published by Stephen Spotte, then Curator of the New York Aquarium, entitled 'Fish and Invertebrate Culture. Waste Management in Closed Systems' published by Wiley-Intersciences in 1970. This book includes an extensive bibliography of more than 120 scientific publications. There are more recent books on the subject, of course, but Spotte's monograph covers the basics, and is intelligible to the general reader.
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