General African Cichlid Discussion • African Cichlid community tank

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Re: African Cichlid community tank

Postby DJRansome » Fri Mar 30, 2018 7:37 am

No, I would not suggest you mix demasoni and peacocks and not add an eel to the mix.
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Re: African Cichlid community tank

Postby drackid » Fri Mar 30, 2018 2:39 pm

But would this work? (in a 75g)

x1 Albino Pindani
x1 Strawberry peacock
x1 Rainbow shark
x1 Britslenose
x3 Yellow labs
x3 P acei
x8 demasoni



And do yall recommendations for any fish that can coexist with the ones above? Even any oddballs that don't grow too large?
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Re: African Cichlid community tank

Postby DJRansome » Fri Mar 30, 2018 11:06 pm

I would not expect that mix to work, no.
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Re: African Cichlid community tank

Postby Cyphro » Sat Mar 31, 2018 12:21 am

You should keep things simple and not mix up too many lakes/types. And probably ditch the demasoni they are bad tank mates unless you really know what you are doing.

So do all peacocks, or all mbunas and labs. Things like rainbow shark you should probably just forget it for an african tank.

you could get yellow labs, acei, and some mainganos to replace the demasoni for example. Start with that and if things go smoothly you can add more from that point.
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Re: African Cichlid community tank

Postby drackid » Sat Mar 31, 2018 10:28 pm

Why are the Demasoni not good? (just want to know)

And would getting only female demasoni or only makes work better?
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Re: African Cichlid community tank

Postby Cyphro » Sun Apr 01, 2018 12:57 am

They are one of the most aggressive cichlids around and don't mix well with anything on your list.
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Re: African Cichlid community tank

Postby DJRansome » Sun Apr 01, 2018 7:28 am

They also get sick easily, are expensive to treat and may infect others in the tank.
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Re: African Cichlid community tank

Postby drackid » Sun Apr 01, 2018 5:04 pm

So i just don't get them?

And what can i replace them with?
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Re: African Cichlid community tank

Postby DJRansome » Mon Apr 02, 2018 8:05 pm

To review you want to keep the shark, the plecos and the 2 peacocks no matter what. And you are getting a 75G, is this correct?

After you have the 75G you could stock something like this:
1m:4f yellow labs
1m:4f acei
5 male peacocks that look nothing alike. You have a pink peacock and an albino peacock so you could add one yellow and one blue. Plus maybe 1 male hap like Placodichromis electra or Scianeochromis fryeri.
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Re: African Cichlid community tank

Postby drackid » Tue Apr 03, 2018 11:44 am

I wouldn’t mind givining the shark and the rest but i also realized that’s my white fish is called an Albino Pindani.

Thanks for the stocking ideas! I will see when i get my tank (might be getting a 120 finally!!!) what i will put inside.
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Re: African Cichlid community tank

Postby DJRansome » Tue Apr 03, 2018 4:30 pm

Pindani is not a peacock, so I would not put him with the peacocks...they are an aggressive mbuna. The up-to-date name is Socolofi.
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Re: African Cichlid community tank

Postby wryan » Tue Apr 03, 2018 6:15 pm

drackid wrote:And anyone know anything about Leopard bush fish or Spotted climbing perch

Had two of them that I kept for a while ...

I wouldn't say that they "hide" necessarily ... but it is true that they prefer more of a calm environment than the rest of your current tank inhabitants would likely offer ...

They also have different environmental needs (soft water, lower pH) than Rift Lake cichlids.

Cyphro wrote:They are not good fish for aquariums because they always hide and often don't eat. They can't tolerate light either.

Wow ... lots of misinformation there to unpack ... where to start ? ...

1. Being an ambush predator they prefer shadier areas of the tank, but saying they can't tolerate light is ... a bit of a stretch. I found the two that I had to be quite willing to venture into the light for food. Mine absolutely loved freeze-dried Tubifex.

They will come out to the front/top of the tank as you approach it to be feed. I'd guess they could be trained to eat from your hand fairly easily.

2. They aren't a good fish for SOME aquariums ... but that isn't to say they aren't a good fish for ANY aquarium.

Given their rather slow, plodding, and methodical nature, they are not good candidates for a high-activity aquarium with lots of aggressive fish as large or larger than themselves. Outside of all the activity probably being disturbing to the Leopard bush fish itself, they will be out-competed for food by the other fish.

They do tend to have aggression issues with their own kind ... of the two I had, one was smaller than the other.

Initially this wasn't a problem but once the larger one started getting big, it would pester the smaller one to the point of driving it to the top corners at the back of the tank.

Eventually, I removed the one being bullied to it's own tank.
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Re: African Cichlid community tank

Postby Cyphro » Tue Apr 03, 2018 6:49 pm

wryan wrote:
drackid wrote:And anyone know anything about Leopard bush fish or Spotted climbing perch

Had two of them that I kept for a while ...

I wouldn't say that they "hide" necessarily ... but it is true that they prefer more of a calm environment than the rest of your current tank inhabitants would likely offer ...

They also have different environmental needs (soft water, lower pH) than Rift Lake cichlids.

Cyphro wrote:They are not good fish for aquariums because they always hide and often don't eat. They can't tolerate light either.

Wow ... lots of misinformation there to unpack ... where to start ? ...

1. Being an ambush predator they prefer shadier areas of the tank, but saying they can't tolerate light is ... a bit of a stretch. I found the two that I had to be quite willing to venture into the light for food. Mine absolutely loved freeze-dried Tubifex.

They will come out to the front/top of the tank as you approach it to be feed. I'd guess they could be trained to eat from your hand fairly easily.

2. They aren't a good fish for SOME aquariums ... but that isn't to say they aren't a good fish for ANY aquarium.

Given their rather slow, plodding, and methodical nature, they are not good candidates for a high-activity aquarium with lots of aggressive fish as large or larger than themselves. Outside of all the activity probably being disturbing to the Leopard bush fish itself, they will be out-competed for food by the other fish.

They do tend to have aggression issues with their own kind ... of the two I had, one was smaller than the other.

Initially this wasn't a problem but once the larger one started getting big, it would pester the smaller one to the point of driving it to the top corners at the back of the tank.

Eventually, I removed the one being bullied to it's own tank.


You mean misinformation shortly to follow in your post I guess.

They dwell in extremely dark and muddy waters in africa and a brightly lit aquarium is torture for them.

Of course it's POSSIBLE to put them in an aquarium, and torture them. And keep them alive if you try hard enough, and they don't technically die the instant they go in the light lol.

However if you have a fish that hates everything about aquarium life and can only be coaxed to eat and keep living with live food and otherwise does all it can to hide itself then no, no one reasonable would say this is a creature that belongs in an aquarium.

I am hardly a peta nut but seriously, this is just a situation where you are torturing some poor animal just for the #%$& of it. Now you say go ahead and throw them into an mbuna tank. LOL that is just ludicrous, sorry.
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Re: African Cichlid community tank

Postby Deeda » Wed Apr 04, 2018 1:50 pm

Cyphro, it was the OP that asked about the Leopard Bush fish and wryan was just providing his experience with keeping this species of fish. No where did anyone suggest keeping that species with Mbuna.
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Re: African Cichlid community tank

Postby wryan » Wed Apr 04, 2018 3:42 pm

Cyphro wrote:You mean misinformation shortly to follow in your post I guess.

They dwell in extremely dark and muddy waters in africa and a brightly lit aquarium is torture for them.

Do you have any sources to support and back up what is obviously the OPINION expressed and highlighted above ?

Like say:

"...

Habitat and Niche

Ctenopoma acutirostre is found in the rivers, streams, lakes and swamps of the Congo River basin. It may live in areas of fairly rapid water movement but seems to prefer places with less current. This fish is primarily an ambush hunter. It will lie in wait, often at the edge of thick vegetation, for an unsuspecting smaller fish to blunder into range. The Leopard Ctenopoma will also actively hunt at night. Food items include smaller fish, amphibians and insects.

Personal Experiences with Ctenopoma acutirostre

I first encountered this fascinating fish in the 1970s and have rarely seen it for sale since then. Only recently was I fortunate enough to find a tankful of small C. acutirostre for sale at a local fish store. I immediately purchased three of them.

Ctenopoma acutirostre is a relatively shy fish, only exhibiting aggression to others of its own kind. This usually takes the form of body wagging displays and occasionally head butts.

This fish prefers a heavily-planted aquarium and does not much appreciate robust or overly aggressive tank-mates. It is decidedly predatory in nature and smaller fish are not safe in a tank with the Leopard Ctenopoma. As previously mentioned, the mouth is quite large on this fish and it is capable of swallowing a fish up to 1/3 its own size. As long as its tank-mates are too large to be considered food, the Leopard Ctenopoma makes a fairly good community fish. I do not recommend that it be kept with overly aggressive types of cichlids, as it will not defend itself vigorously.

Tank size should be a minimum of 20 gallons for adult fish, though juveniles do very well in smaller aquariums. Plenty of hiding places should be provided.

Feeding the Leopard Ctenopoma is usually not difficult as they will take almost any kind of meaty food. I have had success with frozen bloodworms, appropriately-sized pieces of shrimp (fresh, frozen or freeze-dried), brine shrimp (live and frozen), pieces of earthworm, and the occasional small feeder fish. Flake food is generally ignored completely.

Care should be taken with these fish as they can and will jump out of the aquarium. Openings should be secured as much as is possible.

One interesting behavior that C. acutirostre shares with various Leaf Fish is that it seems to enjoy a good yawn every so often. It is then that the aquarist gains a full appreciation of the size of the mouth.

Summary

Ctenopoma acutirostre, the Leopard Ctenopoma, is an uncommonly encountered 'oddball' that makes an excellent community fish as long as its tank-mates are too large to be swallowed. It is an efficient hunter of smaller fish and exhibits very interesting behavior. I recommend it highly." ...


Original source:

http://www.aquariumadvice.com/forums/f29/leopard-ctenopoma-ctenopoma-acutirostre-by-fruitbat-27057.html

Ahhh ... here's another question:

Do you personally have any actual experience with keeping the fish ?

Cyphro wrote:Of course it's POSSIBLE to put them in an aquarium, and torture them. And keep them alive if you try hard enough, and they don't technically die the instant they go in the light lol.

However if you have a fish that hates everything about aquarium life and can only be coaxed to eat and keep living with live food and otherwise does all it can to hide itself then no, no one reasonable would say this is a creature that belongs in an aquarium.

I am hardly a peta nut but seriously, this is just a situation where you are torturing some poor animal just for the #%$& of it.

A lot there I could address ... but given the manner in which I'd be inclined to do it - utterly cruel and merciless comes to mind and would probably be a reasonable and fair characterization :D - I'll avoid doing so (even though I'm actually pretty good at it ...) ... primarily because I'm well aware of the havoc responses to trolls can wreck in an online community.

I am not a Moderator or in any way officially associated with this site, so it really isn't my place to moderate your participation here ... beyond just making a couple of observations as a lay member:

1. You have been here as a member for roughly 2 weeks ... and made a total of 84 posts.

2. During that time, you've managed to take a complete #%$& on - and denigrate through a personal attack (by implying he must on "crack" - a long-time member (Marc Elieson aka "Vatoelvis") who has over 1600 posts in the forum and has written numerous articles (literally dozens) ... which are featured here in the Library.

Now, that doesn't seem to me to be a particularly good way for a new arrival to endear themselves to a community ... although I could certainly be wrong.

But then again, maybe endearing yourself to the community is not really what you are going for, via your participation here ...

Jus' sayin' ...

Cyphro wrote:Now you say go ahead and throw them into an mbuna tank. LOL that is just ludicrous, sorry.

That's not what I said (actually the complete opposite)

I'd suggest you read what I wrote again.
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