South American Cichlids • How many types of acara?

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How many types of acara?

Postby Kipling » Sat Oct 14, 2017 7:08 pm

Hi,
I see Andinoacara pulcher marketed as blue, neon blue, electric blue, and for good measure, electric blue neon.
Can someone please advise if there is any difference between "neon" and "electric blue"?
Cheers
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Re: How many types of acara?

Postby thornsja19 » Sun Oct 15, 2017 5:30 am

Basically if it's a Blue Acara, it's the natural form or it's mislabeled. You can tell because if it's a true Blue Acara, they're very easy to mistake for a Green Terror when young, and even adults keep the similar coloration. Neon Blue and Electric Blue Neon are just different trade names for the Electric Blue Acara, which is a man made color morph of the natural Blue Acara. There 2 are easy to tell apart though, natural Blue Acaras and the man made Electric Blue Acaras have a similar body shape but the coloration is nowhere close. You'll be able to tell the difference just by looking at them
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Re: How many types of acara?

Postby Kipling » Sun Oct 15, 2017 8:32 pm

Many thanks for that clarification.
Cheers
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Re: How many types of acara?

Postby FireHorn123 » Tue Oct 17, 2017 10:32 am

From what I recall there is a black acara too which for some reason is coming up as Cichlosoma Bimaculatum. Which is funny because when Cichlasoma was still a thing the Genus aquedens was a thing as well. I wonder why the black acara was never scientifically named Aquedens isn’t it in the same genus a Aquendens Pulcher and Aquedens Rivulatus?
40gB- (2)Gold Severum, (2)Guppies [Unfinished]
30gL-(2)Rainbow Cichlid Pair, (5)White Skirt Tetras [Finished]
29g- (2) Kribensis Pair (4) Mixed Cory Cats [Nearly Finished]
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Re: How many types of acara?

Postby Mr Chromedome » Tue Oct 17, 2017 11:33 am

The fact that Cichlasoma bimaculatum was the basis for the genus Cichlasoma is the reason for the breakup of the old "Cichlasoma" complex. It also caused a lot of questions about Aequidens, which is still being sorted out. The more recently described Genus Andinoacara was erected to contain the Blue Acara and Green Terror types of Cichlid, but Aequidens is still a genus, containing species such as diadema, metae, tetramerus and the more recently introduced patricki.
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Re: How many types of acara?

Postby FireHorn123 » Fri Oct 20, 2017 9:06 am

That’s really interesting the way that happened so Green Terrors are Andinocara Rivulatus and not Aquedens Rivulatus now? Wow how am I just now realizing this ;) I’ve called the, Aquedens for so long. Are they gonna rename the black acara Andinocara Bimaculatum?
40gB- (2)Gold Severum, (2)Guppies [Unfinished]
30gL-(2)Rainbow Cichlid Pair, (5)White Skirt Tetras [Finished]
29g- (2) Kribensis Pair (4) Mixed Cory Cats [Nearly Finished]
20gL- (1)Male Dwarf Gourami [Unfinished]
10g-Unoccupied
450g Fountain Pond-[HEAVY WORK IN PROGRESS]
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Re: How many types of acara?

Postby Mr Chromedome » Fri Oct 20, 2017 12:00 pm

The Black Acara is not an Acara. It is a true Cichlasoma species. That was determined in 1983 by Kullander, who published a revision of Cichlasoma that removed most of the species previously placed in that Genus. However, the Port Cichlids, of which there are now several species, are the true Cichlasoma species. Andinoacara is a more recent description in the effort to clarify those species that were generally referred to as Aequidens.
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Re: How many types of acara?

Postby BC in SK » Mon Oct 30, 2017 10:44 am

Mr Chromedome wrote:The Black Acara is not an Acara. It is a true Cichlasoma species. That was determined in 1983 by Kullander, who published a revision of Cichlasoma that removed most of the species previously placed in that Genus. However, the Port Cichlids, of which there are now several species, are the true Cichlasoma species.

I find it rather odd that some view Cichlasoma species as some how a different grouping then other Acaras :-? There is really nothing about this genus that would warrant them as being seperate from other Acaras.
Acara is a defunct genus. It became a common name to refer to this entire grouping and is essentially a common name for the tribe Cichlasomatini. All the Acara genera (eg. Aequidens, Andinoacara, Cichlasoma, Krobia, Laetacara. ect) are in the tribe Cichlasomatini.
A number of Cichlasoma species, such as the Port Acara (Cichlasoma portalgrensis), were among those placed in the defunct genus, Acara. One would think they would have more claim to be called an Acara, since unlike most Acaras, once apon a time they were actually in the defunct genus, Acara!
I started in this hobby, being given a tank at 9 yrs. old. Port Acara was among my first fish. All through the '70's and 80's, though not a common fish, they were around and everyone I knew or talked to called them Port ACARAS. I realize common names can be different over time and in different places, but I never even heard the term "Port Cichlid" until about 10 years ago coming on to the internet. For me, it would be like calling a Blue Acara, a "Blue cichlid" :lol:
Not sure I have ever actually seen a Black Acara but certainly read about it in the late '70's. Everyone knew that changes in classification were coming, but at the time I thought it was a simple matter of changing the name Cichlasoma bimaculatum to Aequidens bimaculatum. But since Cichlasoma bimaculatum is the first Cichlasoma described, the type species, it gets the name; it 'owns' the name. In 1983, didn't know classification had those kind of rules :o All the CA cichlids that were formerly in the genus Cichlasoma were now in generic limbo; in need of re-classification. The term Cichlasoma used to mean CA cichlids (and few SA like sevs, festivum and chocalates) but it really doesn't mean that today since the genus is restricted to the Port Acaras.
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