General Aquaria Discussion • Filter wool and filter flow

For general fish and aquarium topics. Including catfish, aquatic plants, ponds, photography, etc.

Moderators: DJRansome, fmueller

Re: Filter wool and filter flow

Postby fmueller » Thu Jun 04, 2015 8:06 am

@ LeeAberdeen

Your liberal usage of terms like 'nonsense', 'lazy' and 'couldn't care less' to me indicates a bit of a defensive attitude on your part. Of course I might be totally I misinterpreting that. There is so much that get's lost when we just read a forum posting rather than have a face to face conversation. At any rate, I am very sorry if I somehow managed to step on your toes. I had no intention of offending you.

I could not agree more with you than when you say there are a gazillion ways of successfully running a tank. Heck, there are even countless people out there who keep and breed fish successfully with old fashioned under gravel filters, even though the overwhelming majority of people on this forum (myself included), would say that this is an outdated and clearly substandard technology. Using filter floss and having long maintenance intervals in canister filters is also very old school, and in my humble opinion it's a technique that is well worth having another look at - especially if you are after efficiency both in running costs and in time required to maintain a tank. Good for you if you are in a situation where money is no issue and you are not interested in reducing the time necessary to maintain filters. I am not in that boat, and from moderating this forum for quite a number of years, I can assure you few CF members are.

Many thanks for pointing out the contradiction in my argument when I claim to be worried about disturbing the bacteria in a well established tank by too frequent filter maintenance, and then ditch the entire load of filter bacteria in one go. That doesn't make sense indeed, and I should rewrite the article in due course. The truth of the matter is that the concern for disturbing bacteria should be reserved for newly set up tanks. With a large filter full of loosely packed filter floss, opening the filter is just not necessary more often than I do. It takes a long time for clogging to become an issue, because the water continues to find new ways through the floss and loads it up with debris fairly evenly over time. When the time for maintenance comes, there are enough bacteria elsewhere in the tank, and I can afford to throw out all the old floss without any ill effect on the fish.

Apart from the throwing out of the media part, the process is quite similar to what happens with Hamburg Matten Filters, which also lean themselves to very long maintenance intervals: http://www.swisstropicals.com/library/mattenfilter/

@ DJRansome

Donna, for anaerobic decomposition to take place in the filter, obviously there would have to be zones in the filter where there is no dissolved oxygen in the water. Since the water I circulate through the system is at or near saturation levels regarding oxygen, I consider that to be extremely unlikely.

If there is anaerobic decomposition, it usually leads to a strong and very characteristic sulphide smell. I have smelled that when opening my filters, which is a blessing because my wife would ban me and the tanks from the house if she ever had endure that stink :D
User avatar
fmueller
Global Moderator
 
Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2004 10:07 pm
Location: Auckland, NZ

Share On:

Share on Facebook Facebook Share on Twitter Twitter

Re: Filter wool and filter flow

Postby Als49 » Mon Jun 08, 2015 9:44 pm

DJRansome wrote:I only clean canisters every 3 months or so...


Me too. Sometimes sooner if the flow becomes slower.

I use Eheim Classic, and I believe I read somewhere in Eheim website that mentions about cleaning the filter periodically every few months. For more often maintenance, they recommend to simply back wash the filter, which is very easy and simple to do in a few minutes.
MantraAQUASCAPE.com

Planted Tanks
95G Discus, Geo
58G N. Brichardi | Neon Jewel | Tropheus
52G Gold Occie | Demasoni, Leleupi, Julie
40B Multi, Julie, Comps
User avatar
Als49
 
Joined: Fri Jul 11, 2014 12:52 am
Location: Jakarta, Indonesia

Re: Filter wool and filter flow

Postby LeeAberdeen » Wed Jun 10, 2015 10:35 am

fmueller wrote:@ LeeAberdeen

Your liberal usage of terms like 'nonsense', 'lazy' and 'couldn't care less' to me indicates a bit of a defensive attitude on your part. Of course I might be totally I misinterpreting that. There is so much that get's lost when we just read a forum posting rather than have a face to face conversation. At any rate, I am very sorry if I somehow managed to step on your toes. I had no intention of offending you.

I could not agree more with you than when you say there are a gazillion ways of successfully running a tank. Heck, there are even countless people out there who keep and breed fish successfully with old fashioned under gravel filters, even though the overwhelming majority of people on this forum (myself included), would say that this is an outdated and clearly substandard technology. Using filter floss and having long maintenance intervals in canister filters is also very old school, and in my humble opinion it's a technique that is well worth having another look at - especially if you are after efficiency both in running costs and in time required to maintain a tank. Good for you if you are in a situation where money is no issue and you are not interested in reducing the time necessary to maintain filters. I am not in that boat, and from moderating this forum for quite a number of years, I can assure you few CF members are.

Many thanks for pointing out the contradiction in my argument when I claim to be worried about disturbing the bacteria in a well established tank by too frequent filter maintenance, and then ditch the entire load of filter bacteria in one go. That doesn't make sense indeed, and I should rewrite the article in due course. The truth of the matter is that the concern for disturbing bacteria should be reserved for newly set up tanks. With a large filter full of loosely packed filter floss, opening the filter is just not necessary more often than I do. It takes a long time for clogging to become an issue, because the water continues to find new ways through the floss and loads it up with debris fairly evenly over time. When the time for maintenance comes, there are enough bacteria elsewhere in the tank, and I can afford to throw out all the old floss without any ill effect on the fish.

Apart from the throwing out of the media part, the process is quite similar to what happens with Hamburg Matten Filters, which also lean themselves to very long maintenance intervals: http://www.swisstropicals.com/library/mattenfilter/

@ DJRansome

Donna, for anaerobic decomposition to take place in the filter, obviously there would have to be zones in the filter where there is no dissolved oxygen in the water. Since the water I circulate through the system is at or near saturation levels regarding oxygen, I consider that to be extremely unlikely.

If there is anaerobic decomposition, it usually leads to a strong and very characteristic sulphide smell. I have smelled that when opening my filters, which is a blessing because my wife would ban me and the tanks from the house if she ever had endure that stink :D


You're definitely reading too much into that. I was just questioning, not having a go. Without reading the article again, I think "lazy" (or a synonym) was your usage, and the "couldn't care less" was a reference to myself and, within reason, my attitude to spending on my fish. I do believe, though, that the notion of cleaning a filter damages the bacteria is nonsense. As I said, if that was the case, we'd all be regularly undergoing mini-cycles.

Your comments did make me think about the reactions in the filter though, and I've now realised that my previous objections to any sort of dirt in the bottom of the canister is questionable. As you said, it's possible that there's some sort of beneficial process taking place with the bacteria actually multiplying in that soup-like stuff. Maybe cleaning a filter once a month is too much but, as I've had no problems doing it that way, I'll probably stick to that maintenance schedule.
75g - Mixed - Yellow labs, Jalo Reef, Red-Top Hongi, Rubin Red
150g - Mixed all-male - Protomelas Steveni 'Taiwan Reef', Jacobfreibergi Eureka, OB Fire, Aulonocara Sunset, Fryeri Blue Ice, Chromobotia Macracanthus
LeeAberdeen
 
Joined: Thu Sep 04, 2014 10:37 am
Location: Aberdeen

Re: Filter wool and filter flow

Postby fmueller » Thu Jun 11, 2015 10:29 pm

LeeAberdeen wrote:as I've had no problems doing it that way, I'll probably stick to that maintenance schedule.


If it ain't broken, don't fix it :)

Some time ago I had the good fortune of meeting Heinz Buescher. The name might ring a bell because N. buescheri is named after him. He has been on diving tours to Lake Tanganyika more times than most folks, has received an honorary doctorate for his ichthyological work, which he does as a hobby, and is all around a very humble and personable guy. One thing he said about the hobby really stuck with me, and that's that most of what he has learned over all the years is about stuff that's not required :thumb:
User avatar
fmueller
Global Moderator
 
Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2004 10:07 pm
Location: Auckland, NZ

Previous

Return to General Aquaria Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests