General Aquaria Discussion • Fresh water Clams

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Fresh water Clams

Postby SpeedFreak » Tue Jun 10, 2008 5:41 pm

I recently found small clams about the size of a dime a month or so ago in a local river. Since I found them they have been in a 2 gallon tank with a sand substrate. They have been fine and seem to be perfectly healthy. I was told that they would help keep the water clean in my 75 gal. Although I don't really need them to filter my water or anything I'd almost hate to just get rid of them. They would be going in a Malawi tank. They always bury themselves in the sand and only leave they're two small arms out(the one that sucks in water and the one that blows it out). What do you all think? Should I add them? Anybody know of any perks or negatives that could result? Thanks in advance for all your input.
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hmm

Postby SpeedFreak » Tue Jun 10, 2008 5:58 pm

I just found this article and it seems like what I have, mine are just smaller. Let me know what you guys think. I dont even think the Cichlids will be able to eat them and if somehow they manage once they grow up it wont really matter anyway because they were free. Let me know if you see any problems with this.


The Freshwater Clam is a living filter that helps keep aquarium water clear and clean. By removing uneaten food and detritus from the water column, the Freshwater Clam helps maintain water quality and lower nitrate levels. Like many freshwater bivalves, Corbicual sp. typically buries itself in the substrate. However, spotting its siphon protrude from the substrate is truly captivating to observe. This variety of the Corbiculidae family only reaches a length of about 2", which makes it a suitable addition to well-established aquariums of almost any size.

Though found in temperate freshwater rivers and lakes around the world, this species originates in Asia and has a brown shell, banded in black. For best care, house the Freshwater Clam in an aquarium of at least 10 gallons with medium to very fine substrate. The Freshwater Clam should not be housed with invertebrate-eating fish, such as freshwater puffers.

The Freshwater Clam obtains its nutrition from filtering food and detritus from the water column. If necessary, its diet can be supplemented with a quality invertebrate food. Keep in mind that the Freshwater Clam will not tolerate any copper-based medication. If treating the aquarium with medication containing copper, move the Freshwater Clam to another aquarium. Do not return the Freshwater Clam until the copper in the treated aquarium has been removed by means of chemical filtration.
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Postby Fogelhund » Tue Jun 10, 2008 8:06 pm

Problems;

1. When they die, they breakdown very quickly, and pollute your water, potentially leading to fish deaths.
2. Feeding them in the aquarium requires specialized food for clams.
3. They will bring diseases and illness to your fish.
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Postby SpeedFreak » Tue Jun 10, 2008 8:15 pm

Fogelhund wrote:Problems;

1. When they die, they breakdown very quickly, and pollute your water, potentially leading to fish deaths.
2. Feeding them in the aquarium requires specialized food for clams.
3. They will bring diseases and illness to your fish.


Hmmm that was a lot of negatives.... Is there anything positive? The article made it seem good but of course they're trying to sell them. Theres good and bad with everything, does the bad out way the good for sure?

thanks
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Postby doncherry0 » Tue Jun 10, 2008 8:17 pm

The higher temperatures of the tank may also be bad for the clams. I recall reading an article a few years back ny a guy who tried to use Zebra Mussels in his tank. They did well until temps got into the 70's then stopped filtering. Above 75ish they began to die off. In general animals from temperate North America do not mix well with animals from tropical Africa.
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Postby SpeedFreak » Tue Jun 10, 2008 8:21 pm

doncherry0 wrote:The higher temperatures of the tank may also be bad for the clams. I recall reading an article a few years back ny a guy who tried to use Zebra Mussels in his tank. They did well until temps got into the 70's then stopped filtering. Above 75ish they began to die off. In general animals from temperate North America do not mix well with animals from tropical Africa.



yeah i didn't consider that... thanks
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Postby SpeedFreak » Tue Jun 10, 2008 8:21 pm

doncherry0 wrote:The higher temperatures of the tank may also be bad for the clams. I recall reading an article a few years back ny a guy who tried to use Zebra Mussels in his tank. They did well until temps got into the 70's then stopped filtering. Above 75ish they began to die off. In general animals from temperate North America do not mix well with animals from tropical Africa.



yeah i didn't consider that... thanks
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Postby Fogelhund » Tue Jun 10, 2008 8:26 pm

SpeedFreak wrote:Hmmm that was a lot of negatives.... Is there anything positive? The article made it seem good but of course they're trying to sell them. Theres good and bad with everything, does the bad out way the good for sure?

thanks


Does their need to be positives?

You are putting your fish at risk here. Why play Russian Roulette with them?
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Postby SpeedFreak » Tue Jun 10, 2008 8:53 pm

Fogelhund wrote:
SpeedFreak wrote:Hmmm that was a lot of negatives.... Is there anything positive? The article made it seem good but of course they're trying to sell them. Theres good and bad with everything, does the bad out way the good for sure?

thanks


Does their need to be positives?

You are putting your fish at risk here. Why play Russian Roulette with them?



yeah your right thanks
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Postby Darkside » Tue Jun 10, 2008 9:26 pm

Fogelhund wrote:
SpeedFreak wrote:Hmmm that was a lot of negatives.... Is there anything positive? The article made it seem good but of course they're trying to sell them. Theres good and bad with everything, does the bad out way the good for sure?

thanks


Does their need to be positives?

You are putting your fish at risk here. Why play Russian Roulette with them?


In order to make an objective decision there should be both a list of both pros and cons.
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Postby SpeedFreak » Tue Jun 10, 2008 11:36 pm

yeah thats what i wanted. the article said it helps to eliminate nitrate and everything. but everyone seems to be against it so thats fine. i figured maybe someone else had them and could offer some advice but it seems like no one does so theres no need for me to jeopardize my fish. they would have been nice but i dont need them
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Postby kingpoiuy » Wed Jun 11, 2008 11:39 am

I've often wondered what invert's live in malawi. Are there any?
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Postby SpeedFreak » Wed Jun 11, 2008 3:53 pm

yeah thats a good question. if anyone wants them they can have them just let me know
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Postby PsYcHoTiC_MaDmAn » Wed Jun 11, 2008 7:34 pm

kingpoiuy wrote:I've often wondered what invert's live in malawi. Are there any?


several species of snail, a freshwater sponge, fairly certain there are some shrimp as well.

not to mention the various larval stages of insects (the midge towers are something that spring to mind)

a quick google found me this this
Live in the UK?
Interested in cichlids?
Then Join the British Cichlid Association
http://www.britishcichlid.com
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Postby jordanroda » Thu Jun 12, 2008 12:48 am

PsYcHoTiC_MaDmAn wrote:
kingpoiuy wrote:I've often wondered what invert's live in malawi. Are there any?


several species of snail, a freshwater sponge, fairly certain there are some shrimp as well.

not to mention the various larval stages of insects (the midge towers are something that spring to mind)

a quick google found me this this
u forgot crabs... :thumb:
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