General Aquaria Discussion • Extreme Algae Growth!

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Extreme Algae Growth!

Postby INeedHelpLol » Mon Jul 05, 2021 11:37 pm

Hello, I've had this multifasciatus tank for about 3 months, cycled and stocked with 6 multies (I've got a pair who have 5 fry right now). Parameters look okay, nitrates less than 20 ppm, pH ~ 7.6. But the tank is completely overrun by green hair algae and blue green algae (cyanobacteria). I've got java fern and valisneria growing in there. I do not add ferts. The light stays on from 9 am to 7 PM, sharp, each day. And I know that is a pretty large photo period but the plants I've added are very new, about a week old and prior to their introduction the light was only for viewing the tank and giving the fish a steady day night cycle. Now, I'm wondering how I can eliminate the cyanobacteria without meds, and curb the green hair algae?
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Re: Extreme Algae Growth!

Postby DJRansome » Tue Jul 06, 2021 7:59 am

Cyanobacteria: Remove it physically as much as possible and I would remove the vallisneria if you are not going to add fertilizer. How much less than 20ppm are the nitrates?

Vallisneria is a fast grower and if the fertilizer does not keep up with the growth it can leak plant fluids that the cyanobacteria love.

What is your phosphate test result?

For plants the max light you need is six hours...especially for java fern.

The solution to algae is always remove nutrients and light.
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Re: Extreme Algae Growth!

Postby INeedHelpLol » Tue Jul 06, 2021 11:39 am

Gotcha. Nitrate levels seem to be right under 20 ppm, the color is not quite the same as the chart but it is definitely not over 20. Somewhere around 15 ppm I'd say.
I do not have a phosphate test.
I will reduce the photo period from about 9am to 3pm or maybe even for a 3 hour period (contemplating doing a blackout) after removing the vals and my j. fern to my 20 gallon planted.
Solid plan?
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Re: Extreme Algae Growth!

Postby DJRansome » Tue Jul 06, 2021 3:01 pm

Change 50% of the water. You may want to consider getting a phosphate test. Six hours for plants like vals...java fern are usually OK with less.
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Re: Extreme Algae Growth!

Postby Auballagh » Tue Jul 06, 2021 10:19 pm

Hmmmmmmm.....
I've often said - "If you ask three of the long-term contributors here a question? You might get FIVE answers!"
-
So, Aquatic Plants.
Many of us on C-f have some - or a lot - of experience with keeping aquatic plants in the aquarium. And yes, there are some interesting methods to keep aquatic plants in the aquarium that will ultimately prove to be successful.
And, some of us have personally discovered that a lot of of those methods probably won't work out so well.... And, as they sometimes say in the ultimate disclaimer - "Your mileage may vary...."

https://www.cichlid-forum.com/phpBB/vie ... 3&t=453821

- Agreement -
- Physically remove all visual evidence of the Cyanobacteria and Green Hair Algae. Yes! I'm talking detailed work. Remove. That. Stuff....
- Nutrient Removal. To begin: Conduct a 90 Percent water change. Carefully clean all filter media in tank water - AFTER the big water change. Then do yet another 80 to 90 percent water change.
-
- Partial Agreement -
- Valisneria. DO NOT attempt to keep this Nutrient Hog in gravel, sand or weird, tech-type substrate stuff! Seriously, unless you push CO2 injection in the tank, it's just not gonna work. So, if you really want that Valisneria, you're going to have to plant it down in something rich in nutrients. That means POTTING SOIL. Two ways to do this:
1) 2 inch layer of potting soil under a sand or gravel substrate.
2) Potted up in potting soil, with a gravel top-coat .
Otherwise, yes.... I agree. stressed Valisneria can do some (badly) weird things to a planted tank.
-
- Disagreement -
- LIGHTS. You need more. MORE!!!! Check the cover glass and ensure it's sparkling clean. If you have SOME Dedicated Grow Lights installed - you may need MORE lights. MORE Intensity. Oh, and my lights were placed on a 14 HOUR, ON schedule, (10 hours off).
- PLANTS. You just can't half-*ss this thing, and expect to succeed, esp. if you go with full substrate method potting soil. Go BIG Baby! Or, just go home..... So, if you're just going with the Java Fern and Valisneria that will work, yes. But, you're going to need to plant that stuff basically.... EVERYWHERE. I strongly recommend going with multiple plant species, because it enhances opportunities for different plant species to peak at different times/intervals in the yearly cycle of the aquarium.
-
-
My strategy with aquatic plants has always been to out-compete the algae and other 'buzz-kills' that will inevitably show up to attack your aquarium. Given the right parameters, your aquatic plants will learn to fight back against algae (allele pathogens) if you give them a chance.
And c'mon, a heavily planted tank is indeed.... it's own wonder to behold. :)
Find What You Love And Let It kill You!
What matters most is how well you walk through the fire...
- Charles Bukowski -
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Re: Extreme Algae Growth!

Postby INeedHelpLol » Wed Jul 07, 2021 12:35 am

DJRansome wrote:Change 50% of the water. You may want to consider getting a phosphate test. Six hours for plants like vals...java fern are usually OK with less.


I'll see if I can get my hands on one of those. Yup, will do a WC tomorrow when i can get some free time, have an interview.
Thanks for the help!
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Re: Extreme Algae Growth!

Postby INeedHelpLol » Wed Jul 07, 2021 12:40 am

Bud, very interesting to read and I thank you for this, but I am not going for a fully planted setup at all. This is a lake tanganyikan tank; almost any plant that I put in there will get dig up by the multies lol. And i am going to refrain from bumping up the photoeriod that much since i do not have any meaningful amount of plant growth in there at all, I'd say... that would be inviting more algae... and adding ferts- well I'm aiming to keep the nitrates and other factors as low as possible for the health of the fish. I appreciate this though; I imagine it'd be helpful for someone aiming to achieve a fully planted tank!
Auballagh wrote:Hmmmmmmm.....
I've often said - "If you ask three of the long-term contributors here a question? You might get FIVE answers!"
-
So, Aquatic Plants.
Many of us on C-f have some - or a lot - of experience with keeping aquatic plants in the aquarium. And yes, there are some interesting methods to keep aquatic plants in the aquarium that will ultimately prove to be successful.
And, some of us have personally discovered that a lot of of those methods probably won't work out so well.... And, as they sometimes say in the ultimate disclaimer - "Your mileage may vary...."

https://www.cichlid-forum.com/phpBB/vie ... 3&t=453821

- Agreement -
- Physically remove all visual evidence of the Cyanobacteria and Green Hair Algae. Yes! I'm talking detailed work. Remove. That. Stuff....
- Nutrient Removal. To begin: Conduct a 90 Percent water change. Carefully clean all filter media in tank water - AFTER the big water change. Then do yet another 80 to 90 percent water change.
-
- Partial Agreement -
- Valisneria. DO NOT attempt to keep this Nutrient Hog in gravel, sand or weird, tech-type substrate stuff! Seriously, unless you push CO2 injection in the tank, it's just not gonna work. So, if you really want that Valisneria, you're going to have to plant it down in something rich in nutrients. That means POTTING SOIL. Two ways to do this:
1) 2 inch layer of potting soil under a sand or gravel substrate.
2) Potted up in potting soil, with a gravel top-coat .
Otherwise, yes.... I agree. stressed Valisneria can do some (badly) weird things to a planted tank.
-
- Disagreement -
- LIGHTS. You need more. MORE!!!! Check the cover glass and ensure it's sparkling clean. If you have SOME Dedicated Grow Lights installed - you may need MORE lights. MORE Intensity. Oh, and my lights were placed on a 14 HOUR, ON schedule, (10 hours off).
- PLANTS. You just can't half-*ss this thing, and expect to succeed, esp. if you go with full substrate method potting soil. Go BIG Baby! Or, just go home..... So, if you're just going with the Java Fern and Valisneria that will work, yes. But, you're going to need to plant that stuff basically.... EVERYWHERE. I strongly recommend going with multiple plant species, because it enhances opportunities for different plant species to peak at different times/intervals in the yearly cycle of the aquarium.
-
-
My strategy with aquatic plants has always been to out-compete the algae and other 'buzz-kills' that will inevitably show up to attack your aquarium. Given the right parameters, your aquatic plants will learn to fight back against algae (allele pathogens) if you give them a chance.
And c'mon, a heavily planted tank is indeed.... it's own wonder to behold. :)
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Location: United States

Re: Extreme Algae Growth!

Postby DJRansome » Wed Jul 07, 2021 8:07 am

Among other things Auballah is trying to tell you is go fully planted or remove all plants. This is true...one/two plants is rarely successful.
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Re: Extreme Algae Growth!

Postby INeedHelpLol » Wed Jul 07, 2021 3:18 pm

Gotcha, gotcha. Hmm... now that I think about it, it makes sense. Thanks again, both of you.
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Re: Extreme Algae Growth!

Postby Auballagh » Fri Jul 09, 2021 9:36 pm

Auballagh wrote:Hmmmmmmm.....
I've often said - "If you ask three of the long-term contributors here a question? You might get FIVE answers!"
-
-
-
My strategy with aquatic plants has always been to out-compete the algae and other 'buzz-kills' that will inevitably show up to attack your aquarium. Given the right parameters, your aquatic plants will learn to fight back against algae (allele pathogens) if you give them a chance.

-
Diana Walstad was NOT wrong.
You need enough plants in a planted tank, or they will never be able to take care of themselves. They will not thrive in what always, eventually becomes a hostile environment for them. I have NEVER seen 'partially' planted aquariums with healthy, vibrant plants in it. The plants in these kinds of tanks may survive, yes.... but they almost always all look small, weak and are perpetually being 'rescued' in cleaning the attacking algae off of the struggling plants, by the hapless aquarium keeper.
-
My potted, substrate rooted plants were successfully kept with New World Cichlids - whose (infamous!) substrate digging and tank decor 'adjusting' capabilities would make a Tracked Excavator envious. Those potted plants, combined with various species of non-substrate plants in the aqaurium, were a total success. My aquatic plants in those tanks just flat-out DESTROYED that algae. :D
Find What You Love And Let It kill You!
What matters most is how well you walk through the fire...
- Charles Bukowski -
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