Lake Tanganyika Species • Question about mixing Paracyprichromis

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Question about mixing Paracyprichromis

Postby manueljoaocosta » Tue Apr 22, 2008 6:29 pm

Hello!

I'm thinking about mixing Paracyprichromis nigr.Blue Neon Albin with Paracyprichromis nigr.Blue Neon! Does anybody know if there is any problem?
Thanks!
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Postby fmueller » Wed Apr 23, 2008 12:34 am

Moved from Tank Setups
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Postby Charles » Wed Apr 23, 2008 1:56 am

I don't think so. They will crossbreed and produce some spit-gene... other than that, I don't think you have any aggression issue.
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Postby fishoverlivingspace » Wed Apr 23, 2008 2:01 am

Agreed. If its a breeding tank, bad idea... if its just a display tank for some nice fish, should work out great.
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Postby Charles » Wed Apr 23, 2008 2:04 am

why is a bad idea? albino neon blue x neon blue = spit gene neon blue. I doubt it anyone can tell which neon blue coming from which collection point.
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Postby manueljoaocosta » Wed Apr 23, 2008 5:44 am

Thank you guys!
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Postby fishoverlivingspace » Wed Apr 23, 2008 11:22 am

I just think that different locales come from different locales for a reason. If it can be avoided, they shouldn't be cross-bred. Its just my opinion, its not like its going to do major damage to the gene pool or anything... it might actually make it stronger bringing in something that has had different genes coming on for many generations, but I like keeping things as pure as possible.
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Postby noddy » Wed Apr 23, 2008 2:17 pm

I don't think that an albino paracyp is necessarily from a different location than a blue neon, you can find both types in any given location.
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Postby fishoverlivingspace » Wed Apr 23, 2008 2:24 pm

Ha.. I didn't even read what they were, I just saw they were both nigripinnis and assumed they were from different collection points. Disregard whatever I said! Go for it!
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Postby 12pointer » Wed Apr 23, 2008 7:31 pm

An abino Blue neon would not be from a different location than a normal Blue Neon. A albino is just lacking pigment. Its not normale in the lakes but it does happen just like albino reptiles and humans. If it was me I would mix them. Its not going to create a hybrid, because its the same fish its just lacking pigment.
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albino Paracyp

Postby zebra7 » Fri Apr 25, 2008 9:43 pm

Breeder's like myself will often introduce a normal strain of Paracyp. to spawn with their Albino group. It definately will strengthen the Albino strain with the addition of new blood to the group. This will make a difference with spawn size, birth defect's and other ailment's associated with the line breeding of a weak albino strain.
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Postby fishoverlivingspace » Fri Apr 25, 2008 9:59 pm

Yeah, now that I actually realize he was talking about the same collection point, just albino vs. normal coloration, I totally agree. Line breeding is only good to a point. You have to put some new genes in every now and then.

That's kind of beside the point in this thread though... the point is, mixing those fish will 99.9% likely cause 0 harm(I'd say 100%, but then you could sue me :lol: ).
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