Lake Tanganyika Species • Questions about shell dwellers

Discussion regarding only Lake Tanganyika species.

Moderators: Mcdaphnia, nodima

Re: Questions about shell dwellers

Postby naturlvr » Sun Oct 13, 2019 12:17 pm

Kiks wrote:
DJRansome wrote:If the fish is repeatedly driven toward the surface, that is too much. Multi's like a lot of shells...100 are not too many. But usually all in one pile...multi level.


The fish that's getting chased is chased around the tank by a male (the one with the spot in the pictures) that seems to think it owns more than half the tank. Other fish are allowed into its territory except for this one fish. It is chased approximately half way towards the surface, but sometimes it's also just chased around the tank until it leaves the area, which it is pretty reluctant to do for some reason.

Do you have any suggestions on how to lower the aggressions? I assume more shells will help, but are there other things I can do?


Leave them alone is the best thing and easy. It took my Gold Ocellatus and Lamprologus Signatus at least a month or two to decide who was going to occupy what. And they still haven't all found a spot. The ones that have..guard it well and the others swim around together. The aggression is how they set up their pecking order. You can't really stop it. I tried putting a tall rock between some areas to provide some separation but they just swam around it and continued to do what they do. I learned that I cannot outsmart them and best to give up and let them live. They show aggression but no one has killed another of their kind. It is just their "language" and I best remain neutral. One tank is 75 gallon with the Gold Ocellatus, so they have PLENTY of room but they still fight. One day they will all get along better???? But best to let them be them.
naturlvr
 
Joined: Thu May 16, 2019 5:12 pm
Location: United States

Share On:

Share on Facebook Facebook Share on Twitter Twitter

Re: Questions about shell dwellers

Postby naturlvr » Sun Oct 13, 2019 12:23 pm

PS I also found that they like to bury some shells and will bury them again if I intervene. And what DJ said it right but thankfully both tanks have a good amount of room for them so they are ok.
naturlvr
 
Joined: Thu May 16, 2019 5:12 pm
Location: United States

Re: Questions about shell dwellers

Postby Kiks » Sun Oct 13, 2019 12:31 pm

DJRansome wrote:Usually we let them work it out until the reject fish is in danger (relentless chasing over a period of days, especially when the victim fish chooses the direction of the surface), then we rehome either the victim fish or the aggressor.

Of course the victim fish wants to claim a shell. The aggressor has decided the victim is competition. Try more shells first.


More shells are on their way arriving most likely Tuesday or Wednesday so I'm hoping that will make a difference. Hopefully they'll figure it out.

[
Leave them alone is the best thing and easy. It took my Gold Ocellatus and Lamprologus Signatus at least a month or two to decide who was going to occupy what. And they still haven't all found a spot. The ones that have..guard it well and the others swim around together. The aggression is how they set up their pecking order. You can't really stop it. I tried putting a tall rock between some areas to provide some separation but they just swam around it and continued to do what they do. I learned that I cannot outsmart them and best to give up and let them live. They show aggression but no one has killed another of their kind. It is just their "language" and I best remain neutral. One tank is 75 gallon with the Gold Ocellatus, so they have PLENTY of room but they still fight. One day they will all get along better???? But best to let them be them.


I think it might seem more violent to me than to someone who's used to cichlids. I'm used to all fish doing their own thing and not caring at all about anyone else cause I'm used to community setups. Maybe they're doing exactly what they're supposed to and I'm the one who has to get used to it. :-)


We'll see what happens when more shells are added. It sounds like there isn't really anything to do when it comes to decorations and such and maybe it's not even necessary for me to do something. I guess it's not as bad as I thought - at least not to the point where I should take action and remove anyone.
Kiks
 
Joined: Thu Oct 10, 2019 7:56 am
Location: Denmark

Re: Questions about shell dwellers

Postby DJRansome » Sun Oct 13, 2019 1:17 pm

It could go quickly south (24 hours or less) for that fish being driven halfway up the tank regularly. Or they could work it out.

I just got a new similis colony and had one like this. It stopped after 2 days and they worked it out. If it were still happening toss up whether the fish would have been killed or I would have removed the aggressor (I have one way bigger than the others) in time.
125G Borleyi, Multipunctata
75G Demasoni, Msobo, Lucipinnis
75G Calvus, Similis, Petricola
User avatar
DJRansome
Global Moderator
 
Joined: Sat Oct 29, 2005 8:30 am
Location: Little Egg Harbor, NJ

Re: Questions about shell dwellers

Postby naturlvr » Sun Oct 13, 2019 1:20 pm

It will be alright..it is nature in action. DJ is right...the only time to intervene is if you see one always in a corner or side of the tank, at the top and they stay there all the time..then take action because in nature they can always escape if need be. I have not lost any of them yet for aggression. Usually the aggression is more chasing them away or giving them a tap to stay away. That is innocuous and part of their life. Good luck. I too had trouble letting go and knowing when to intervene.
naturlvr
 
Joined: Thu May 16, 2019 5:12 pm
Location: United States

Re: Questions about shell dwellers

Postby Kiks » Sun Oct 13, 2019 2:25 pm

DJRansome wrote:It could go quickly south (24 hours or less) for that fish being driven halfway up the tank regularly. Or they could work it out.

I just got a new similis colony and had one like this. It stopped after 2 days and they worked it out. If it were still happening toss up whether the fish would have been killed or I would have removed the aggressor (I have one way bigger than the others) in time.


naturlvr wrote:It will be alright..it is nature in action. DJ is right...the only time to intervene is if you see one always in a corner or side of the tank, at the top and they stay there all the time..then take action because in nature they can always escape if need be. I have not lost any of them yet for aggression. Usually the aggression is more chasing them away or giving them a tap to stay away. That is innocuous and part of their life. Good luck. I too had trouble letting go and knowing when to intervene.


Thank you both (and to everyone else who replied). I'm a little less anxious now and know what to look for when I'm unsure about intervening or not. Hopefully the shells arrive soon and the fish work it out. :-)
Kiks
 
Joined: Thu Oct 10, 2019 7:56 am
Location: Denmark

Re: Questions about shell dwellers

Postby Kiks » Sun Oct 13, 2019 3:33 pm

One more thing:
If it happens that I in the future do need to remove on of them, which one would you remove? The aggressive one or the victim of the aggression? And is there an easy trick to catch them?
Kiks
 
Joined: Thu Oct 10, 2019 7:56 am
Location: Denmark

Re: Questions about shell dwellers

Postby naturlvr » Sun Oct 13, 2019 5:08 pm

Wait for them to go in a shell..sometimes when you put the net close to them...they will dive into a shell and then you can pick up the shell with the net or your hand and move them. I don't know the answer to which one except to say that if one is bigger than the others and he uses it to his advantage...then he would not stop after removing the victim..he would go for another but I am not sure there is a real answer other than try it and see.
naturlvr
 
Joined: Thu May 16, 2019 5:12 pm
Location: United States

Re: Questions about shell dwellers

Postby smashematics » Tue Nov 26, 2019 12:13 am

naturlvr wrote:...Right now I have a pair out of ten gold occellatus that are breeding..started quickly after i got them. So far the babies are not making it and probably eaten by the other fish. I hope the parents soon learn how to protect them, if that is possible because I too want to see an active colony.


I have found Gold Ocellatus to cannibalize their young after trying to chase them away for a few days. One day both the mother & father pair will turn on all the babies. It doesn't happen every time but more often than not. So I would remove the young or parents and grow them out separately.
smashematics
 
Joined: Mon Nov 25, 2019 3:13 am
Location: California

Previous

Return to Lake Tanganyika Species

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 8 guests