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Astatotilapia latifasciata
by Robert De Leon
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Unlike many species from the Lake Victoria region, A. latifasciata is usually not aggressive. Dominant males do harass other males and females, but for the most part there is only some chasing that doesn't result in injuries or undue stress. Despite their mild temperament, they are best kept in groups of one male to multiple females. A couple males and 4 to 6 females can be kept in a 4 foot tank.


Sub-dominant male

In the aquarium A. latifasciata accepts any type of food greedily. A good quality flake or pellet with some plant matter is best young and mature adults. I found that a diet high in protein can bring on spawning. Their peaceful nature makes them ideal tank companions for Lake Malawi mbuna and haps. Especially if you are looking to add some reds and yellows to your tank. A. latifasciata also does well with other Victorians and I've kept them with Aulonocara without issues.


Male and female about to spawn

Astatotilapia latifasciata was one of the first species that bred for me consistently. More than consistently, it was out of control. I couldn't sell, trade or give away offspring fast enough. At one time I gave away over 80 juveniles to someone only because I was out of tank space and he was willing to take them. Not only did my adult females get into a routine of spawning every 4 to 6 weeks, but I had a female barely over one inch in size spawn in a grow-out tank. This small female held her eggs for a couple of weeks until I stripped 20 healthy fry. All fry were usually fed newly hatched brine shrimp or crushed flake. Eventually I began using Cyclop-eeze on newly released fry with great success.

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