Aquarium Setup • Is there anything that can survive boiling water?

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Is there anything that can survive boiling water?

Postby GaFishMan1181 » Tue Sep 28, 2010 1:19 pm

We own a house on a nice creek with some beautiful sand. There are nice little pieces of clear rocks, sand, little specs of gold colored rocks, and many different sizes and shapes of different sand/rocks.

I know it is easier just to buy play sand but there is nothing out on the market that looks as nice as this.

I have several 10 gallon pots with large boilers and was thinking of boiling the sand and getting enough to fill my tank up.

So my question is: Is there anything that can survive boiling water that could cause harm to my fish?

Anything else i should worry about when trying to use sand from a river/creek?

Thanks
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Postby Jowlz » Tue Sep 28, 2010 1:44 pm

I live right on the water also. I have never gone as far as boiling rocks etc...but all my tank decorations are removed from the water behind my house or our slate quarry. Usually, I just let the rocks I want to use sit and dry in the sun for a couple days, then I scrub them and put them in the tank.

Maybe I have been lucky with not boiling, but have never had any ill effects from using locally acquired rocks etc. I may be wrong but I highly doubt many of the rocks etc that people buy were ever boiled.....
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Postby wlyons9856 » Tue Sep 28, 2010 2:16 pm

There are several bacteria than can live in either boiling water or ice itself, I'm not saying that those types will be in the river sand. I would boil it just to be safe though.
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Postby Dj823cichild » Tue Sep 28, 2010 4:23 pm

:thumb: + 1
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Postby GaFishMan1181 » Tue Sep 28, 2010 4:30 pm

Anyone know how many 5g buckets i need to fill up to have enough for a 125g?
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Postby wlyons9856 » Tue Sep 28, 2010 6:13 pm

Measure the weight of one bucket of sand, see how many pounds it is, then divide that number by 125 and that should tell you how many buckets you need.
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Postby duds » Tue Sep 28, 2010 7:14 pm

wlyons9856 wrote:Measure the weight of one bucket of sand, see how many pounds it is, then divide that number by 125 and that should tell you how many buckets you need.

So if his bucket weighs 20 lbs he should use 0.16 buckets? :wink:
For my 48" x18" tank I am using about 75 lbs of sand... not sure of your footprint but I'm assuming it's a six foot tank? If so I'd say go with between 100 and 125 lbs of sand. Probably around 2 five gallon buckets.
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Postby wlyons9856 » Tue Sep 28, 2010 7:24 pm

Reciprocate that, 125/weight of the bucket lol, sheesh
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Postby mlancaster » Tue Sep 28, 2010 9:06 pm

Hi GaFishMan1181,

I have read concerns about metal content in rocks and the effects on aquarium water. I do not know much about this myself, but may be something you want to look into.

Sounds like there is at least pyrite in your river, so may want to see if it is ok.

Again, I have no knowledge on this just something you may want to look into; could be totally fine.

Thanks,
Matt
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Postby CichMomma » Tue Sep 28, 2010 10:16 pm

Endospores can survive being boiled in water unless it is for many hours. This shouldn't be something that would be of concern for a fish tank however. :)
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46 gal Bf - Rescued Jewel Cichlids
20L - 6 *new* Multies!
15 gal - planted, diy CO2, dry ferts
5 gal Fluval Chi - Neon Tetras
2.5 gallon- Betta Bob in my son's room :)

Want another, BIGGER tank BAD!!!
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Postby GaFishMan1181 » Tue Sep 28, 2010 10:29 pm

Thanks for everyone's comments.

I think i will boil it and hope that there are no bacteria that can survive the heat and harm my fish. As far as live parasites go i am guessing they should all be killed by the heat.

I didnt really think about the metal content that could be in the sand. The substrate is 90% sand but the other 10% looks like small pieces of crused up rocks of different types.

When i go to collect the sand i will take a few macro pictures of it so yall can see.

Think i'll go with 3 buckets to be safe and boil it for 30 minutes.
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Postby PfunMo » Wed Sep 29, 2010 12:39 pm

Much easier and safer as well as more effective would be a bleach soak. That's what the pros do to clean up your drinking water. While there is a fair amount of concern for the chlorine in fish tanks it is pretty much proven to be just hysteria not backed by facts. If you read a reliable source on chemicals, you will find it reacts with organics very readily. That's why it cleans up the laundry and kills the bacteria in water. The DNR standards require a 24 hour exposure time. That is because some things we want to kill can form hard shells and it takes some time for the chlorine to penetrate those. The problem with chlorine from a sanitation standpoint is that it does also gas off quickly into the air. The major water providers now use chloramine which does not disipate into the air so well. For cleaning up rocks and wood for the tank, many of us use a bleach bath overnight. For removing the chlorine then it is a matter of rinsing to dilute it and then when it air dries the rest is gone into the air. You might not need to do anything and boiling for several hours might work but bleach is easy and what the government uses to clean up water.
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Postby BillD » Wed Sep 29, 2010 2:39 pm

I agree with the bleach idea. It is what I do, and is less effort than boiling.
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Postby GaFishMan1181 » Wed Sep 29, 2010 3:23 pm

How much bleach do i use in half a 5g bucket filled with sand>?

How long do i do this for?

Seems like i would have to rinse it alot to get all the bleach out. Dont want to harm my fish with bleach.
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Postby truckpoetry » Wed Sep 29, 2010 4:57 pm

Wouldn't you just use "dechlorinator" to get rid of the bleach? Since it is just chlorine anyway, I'd think you could use the same stuff you use to get the Chlorine out of your tap water (though perhaps at higher dose).
Down to one tank. Here it is:
125g
Pleco, 1 JD (M), 1 pink convict (M), 2xFiremouth (M), 1 Red Spotted Gold Severum, 1 Green Terror, Small Handful of various dithers (Silver Dollars, Colombian & Buenos Aires Tetras)
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