Equipment & Supplies • Bio-Balls vs. Ceramic Rings

For discussion regarding filters, lights, heaters, pumps, etc.

Moderators: Deeda, Kanorin

bio balls or ceramic rings?

Bio Balls
6
22%
Ceramic Rings
21
78%
 
Total votes : 27

Bio-Balls vs. Ceramic Rings

Postby higuerama » Fri Sep 14, 2007 7:57 am

So, lets see what everyone prefers....
higuerama
 
Joined: Sat Aug 05, 2006 12:18 am
Location: Okinawa, Japan

Share On:

Share on Facebook Facebook Share on Twitter Twitter

Postby maxwell1295 » Fri Sep 14, 2007 8:26 am

It depends...

Bioballs are not as effective when completely submerged. They work much better in a wet-dry environment.

Ceramic rings are better for a submerged media application (like most canister filters).
User avatar
maxwell1295
 
Joined: Sat Feb 18, 2006 1:05 pm
Location: Long Island, NY

Postby thetim6 » Fri Sep 14, 2007 9:14 am

Agreed. Bioballs for wet/dry, ceramic tiles for HOB or canister filters.
vdub
User avatar
thetim6
 
Joined: Thu Jan 23, 2003 10:48 pm
Location: Barreled Up in VirginiaBeach

Postby tropheus duboisi breeder » Fri Sep 14, 2007 3:06 pm

Bioballs are not as effective when completely submerged. They work much better in a wet-dry environment.

Ceramic rings are better for a submerged media application (like most canister filters).


Agree
Mbuna Madness Come and join us

MbunaMan25

55
2x40 Breeder
2x33 Breeder
30
29
20
8x10
User avatar
tropheus duboisi breeder
 
Joined: Tue Jan 30, 2007 10:20 pm
Location: Naperville, IL

Postby geoff_tropheus » Fri Sep 14, 2007 3:23 pm

why are ceramic rings better in canisters than plastic-bio balls?
300G Petrochromis Trewavasae & Tropheus Lunangwa
300G Petrochromis Orthognathus Tri-Color & Tropheus Kambwimba
180G Karilani Island Duboisi & Rutunga & Katoto
180G Ikola
150G mpimbwe Red Cheek
150G brichardi Ujiji
115G annectens Kekese
geoff_tropheus
 
Joined: Thu Feb 13, 2003 1:01 pm
Location: Pasadena, Texas

Postby geoff_tropheus » Fri Sep 14, 2007 3:32 pm

Think about it...

1. If the provided surface area of the ceramic ring equals the same as the plastic bio-ball

2. The waterflow around the ceramic cylinder turbolates just as it does with a plastic bio-ball for oxygen scavenging

...then why are they not as effective?
300G Petrochromis Trewavasae & Tropheus Lunangwa
300G Petrochromis Orthognathus Tri-Color & Tropheus Kambwimba
180G Karilani Island Duboisi & Rutunga & Katoto
180G Ikola
150G mpimbwe Red Cheek
150G brichardi Ujiji
115G annectens Kekese
geoff_tropheus
 
Joined: Thu Feb 13, 2003 1:01 pm
Location: Pasadena, Texas

Postby thecookiemonster » Fri Sep 14, 2007 6:47 pm

A bit off of topic, but:
can ceramic rings be used as a WetDry filter media?
Would they be better than bioballs due to their higher surface area?
User avatar
thecookiemonster
 
Joined: Sat Apr 21, 2007 5:05 am
Location: Sydney, Australia

Postby willyt » Wed Dec 03, 2008 8:29 pm

. how much wood could a woodchuck chuck, if a woodchuck could chuck wood? :fish:
willyt
 
Joined: Tue May 30, 2006 2:24 pm
Location: san antonio

Postby moneygetter1 » Wed Dec 03, 2008 9:58 pm

why are ceramic rings better in canisters than plastic-bio balls?


can ceramic rings be used as a WetDry filter media?
Would they be better than bioballs due to their higher surface area?


8) Bioballs are most effective in an open-air environment (wet/dry - trickle filter) as opposed to a closed system (canisters) because of the oxygen exposure. Trickle filters provide increased oxygenation (as the water is given a larger surface area for oxygen to dissolve in). The increased surface area of well designed bio balls presumably maximises the amount of oxygen dissolving into the water. Oxygen is essential for the conversion of ammonia into nitrities and then to nitrates by aerobic bacteria. Bio balls also work to degas ammonia before bacteria break it down, lessening the load on the filter system. Another advantage of bio balls over other biological media is that the surfaces are impossible to clog up (when used with a prefilter) compared to the micropores of porus ceremic material. The reason is simple: the space within a bioball is large and anything that can clog it up would already have been filtered by the prefilter (such as filter wool, sponge etc). The down side is size & space needed for them to work efficiently. That's why ceramics are better suited in canister setups: minimum space / maximum surface for bacterial growth. "T"
Cardinal, Neon & Pristella Tetra - GBR's - Ghost Shrimp - Raphael Cats - Stendker Discus
125gl TENECOR, Rena XP4, Eheim 2075, 2A/C500, 2MaxiJet 1200's
"KNOWLEDGE GAINED & NOT SHARED IS KNOWLEDGE LOST"
User avatar
moneygetter1
 
Joined: Sun Jan 08, 2006 4:06 pm
Location: The Big City - N.Y.C.


Return to Equipment & Supplies

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests