Unidentified Cichlids • is it a Copadichromis borleyi ?

Here's where you need to go to get help identifying your Cichlids.

Moderators: Chester B, StructureGuy

is it a Copadichromis borleyi ?

Postby sdraiders619 » Fri Mar 16, 2012 12:25 am

a fellow poster razorback and i have been messaging back and forth, he believes it is a borleyi and i agree, but more confirmation would make me more confident in the answer what do you guys think? my LFS had it listed as an assorted peacock but borleyi's are haps?

Image

Image

Image

Image
sdraiders619
 
Joined: Sun Mar 04, 2012 6:54 am
Location: San Diego

Share On:

Share on Facebook Facebook Share on Twitter Twitter

Postby 13razorbackfan » Fri Mar 16, 2012 1:38 am

Technically....peacocks are haps too. Aulonocara is a genus of haplochromine. Your LFS is 100% dead wrong claiming that fish is a peacock. Looks as though it is just starting to show its male characteristics such as the fins becoming more pointed, sides turning more orange, etc....It will continue to turn orange, fins will start to turn some white on its tips and the rest will be a pretty blue. They get rather large though and by the time it reaches maturity it will have outgrown your 40g and started to turn off really aggressive towards even your more aggressive fish.
User avatar
13razorbackfan
 
Joined: Wed Sep 28, 2011 12:19 am
Location: Arkansas

Postby famikert » Fri Mar 16, 2012 1:57 am

Technically....peacocks are haps too. Aulonocara is a genus of haplochromine
are Mbuna also a genus of haplochromine
famikert
 
Joined: Thu Feb 20, 2003 6:40 pm
Location: moving to china to help my sister

Postby 13razorbackfan » Fri Mar 16, 2012 2:27 am

famikert wrote:
Technically....peacocks are haps too. Aulonocara is a genus of haplochromine
are Mbuna also a genus of haplochromine
I believe that mbuna are haplochromines. I think haplochromines are then broken down into two sub groups....mbuna and utaka. Correct me if I am wrong.

I remember reading, I think, that aulonocara may have been put into a new group all its own from other haplochromis species or something to that effect. I am not a biologist so some of the reclassification and where they were put gets a bit confusing.

I found this on google books....it is a very long study done by a couple scientists named "The impact of species changes in African lakes". Here is a link...

http://books.google.com/books?ei=2eFiT_ ... na&f=false

A little light reading I guess if you want more information on the specifics of african cichlids.
User avatar
13razorbackfan
 
Joined: Wed Sep 28, 2011 12:19 am
Location: Arkansas

Postby m1ke715m » Sat Mar 17, 2012 4:04 pm

when people are talking about fish theres 3 groups.. haps, peacocks and mbuna.. dont overcomplicate it lol

utaka are open water dwelling plankton eating haps.. there are haps that are no utaka

i would not characterize peacocks as haps.. they are peacocks

and yea thats a male copadichromis borleyi kandango.. well this species is notoriously hormoned.. I've seen a tank full of them with only a few males starting to get the red on the breast and then come back a month later and all of them had it.. but it does look male as long as it wasnt hormoned
m1ke715m
 

Postby noki » Sun Mar 18, 2012 11:17 am

ALL Malawi cichlids are Haplochromines. Except for the few Tilapia. Same with Lake Victoria cichlids. Lake Tanganayikan has a mix but Tropheus and Petrochromis are the best know Haplochromines.

The Mbuna is a pretty obvious group of specialized rock dwellers who have specially evolved mouths for eating in that area. Their color is less metallic.

The Aulonocara and Lethrinops are specialized sand dwellers, or around sand and rocks. They all tend to have just a vertical juvenile pattern, and a similar head. They are distinct enough from the "Haps" to be given their own big group.

The rest is a mix of fish that used to be just called "Haps" before they created a bunch of new genuses. These fish usually have a horizontal stripe as juveniles, except it may be broken so it looks like 3 spots. Some don't.


Stores are just using the name "Peacock" as a vague rather meaningless term for fish that supposed to be colorful. The hormoned fish they sell are often called "Peacocks". They don't know what they are and they don't care.
...
noki
 
Joined: Fri Jun 13, 2003 1:38 am
Location: OH

Postby 24Tropheus » Sun Mar 18, 2012 11:43 am

Question, can it be a pure Copadichromis borleyi (Kadango) with such clear barring? I know Copadichromis borleyi (Kadango) can have barring but is it not usualy a lot less clear than that in pure guys?

Is it mostly Copadichromis borleyi (Kadango) maybe with some Aulonocara in there too?

Would that make it a Ucock or a Peataka ? :wink:

All the best James
Tanks 180, empty revamping 100,65,60g Tropheus/tang communities 75g revamping. 29gx3 shelly communities, 29g Trigs breeding. 20gx2 shelly tanks. BCA member 207. Try it you might like it.
User avatar
24Tropheus
 
Joined: Tue Jun 20, 2006 9:03 pm
Location: Sawbridgeworth near London UK

Postby sdraiders619 » Sun Mar 18, 2012 4:07 pm

well since this pic he has started to color up a lot, hes gaining a lot of orange on his body and fins, and his face is gaining some blue mostly on his gills right now, his strips have almost disapeared but theyre still noticeable from some angles
sdraiders619
 
Joined: Sun Mar 04, 2012 6:54 am
Location: San Diego

Postby noki » Sun Mar 18, 2012 4:33 pm

I don't think it is unusual for a Copadichromis borleyi (Kadango) male to show some subtle barring at times.
...
noki
 
Joined: Fri Jun 13, 2003 1:38 am
Location: OH


Return to Unidentified Cichlids

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Yahoo [Bot] and 3 guests