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treated or untreated 2x4's for diy stand?

Postby liquid134 » Mon Mar 12, 2012 8:12 pm

planning on doing a "standard" diy 2x4 stand, based off of one for 2 55 gallon tanks, just adding a 3rd level.... anyway, regardless, i cant seem to remember which was better when searching builds.

so treated or un-treated...?
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Postby Deeda » Mon Mar 12, 2012 10:14 pm

untreated!
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Postby 13razorbackfan » Mon Mar 12, 2012 10:50 pm

I would probably do untreated as well. Treated wood is made for outdoor use or use in basements where would would be touching concrete either from basement floor out or outside wall. A splash of water here or there isn't going to hurt your wood especially if you paint or stain it.
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Postby redblufffishguy » Mon Mar 12, 2012 11:23 pm

Either one would work. I would use what ever is cheaper!
80 gallon cichlid
40 gallon Angelfish
29 gallon cylindricus
20 gallon plant
60 gallon - 1 jack dempsey
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Postby cgmark » Tue Mar 13, 2012 8:17 am

It is more important to get the best grade of lumber than it is to get treated. Though treated lumber is usually a higher grade, less knots, etc.
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Postby JohanniMan » Tue Mar 13, 2012 2:07 pm

green treat would add a ton of weight to a stand...
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Postby Bungalowdan » Tue Mar 13, 2012 9:21 pm

I've done a fair number of outdoor projects with treated. Typically, it's soaking wet at the lumber store and quite heavy. I've had it bow and twist as it dries out. Kiln dried lumber has likely bowed or twisted all its going to, so if you pick out straight pieces, they tend to stay that way.

So I'd second untreated. Barring a leak, varnish or paint should give you all the protection you need against the odd splash here and there.
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un treated

Postby tin man » Tue Mar 13, 2012 9:47 pm

Use only untreated lumber around your pets. Treated lumber today has been infused with Chromated copper arsenate (CCA) the old treated wood was infused with arsnic, before that Penta (wood life) also knowen as creasote. These are all nasty chemicals. Lumber is not treated to prevent dammage from moistior alone these chemicals are mixed to kill insects.

If it kills an insect it will kill a fish. if water spills and drips into the tank below it could be deadly.

I use treated lumber only where the wood hits the floor. I make a six by six pad to put the stand on, mostly because I get water seeping in every spring.
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Re: un treated

Postby 13razorbackfan » Tue Mar 13, 2012 11:52 pm

tin man wrote:Use only untreated lumber around your pets. Treated lumber today has been infused with Chromated copper arsenate (CCA) the old treated wood was infused with arsnic, before that Penta (wood life) also knowen as creasote. These are all nasty chemicals. Lumber is not treated to prevent dammage from moistior alone these chemicals are mixed to kill insects.

If it kills an insect it will kill a fish. if water spills and drips into the tank below it could be deadly.

I use treated lumber only where the wood hits the floor. I make a six by six pad to put the stand on, mostly because I get water seeping in every spring.
Correct....and you definitely don't want splinters either. Need to flush and wash immediately or you can get sick....trust me.
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Postby BullyBuddies » Wed Mar 14, 2012 1:13 am

not to mention the toxic dust when fabricating the stand
55 gallon
Saulosi, Red Zebras, Syno. Multis

55 gallon
Msobo and Chewere
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Postby redblufffishguy » Wed Mar 14, 2012 1:12 pm

All very true; however, both will work...
80 gallon cichlid
40 gallon Angelfish
29 gallon cylindricus
20 gallon plant
60 gallon - 1 jack dempsey
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Postby Mike_G » Wed Mar 14, 2012 2:47 pm

Always look at the end grain when you're selecting wood- you want pieces that have narrow growth rings running straight across the narrow part of the board, those are quartersawn and will resist warpage or twisting. They're usually noticeably heavier when you pick them up.
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Postby BillD » Thu Mar 15, 2012 10:28 am

If you are using dimensional lumber of 2 x 4 size, the grade isn't really important as the lumber is already overkill for a tank stand. Even kiln dried lumber will warp and twist if not secured. Ideally you want lumber that has sat in a bundle for a period of time after leaving the kiln.
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Postby redblufffishguy » Thu Mar 15, 2012 1:34 pm

BillD I totally agree with you!

2 x 4 is definately overkill, I have said this many times before on this website. But, this time i think 2 x 4 is appropriate. I wouldn't suggest anything smaller for a third level tank, especially a 55 gallon.

And to be honest, I wouldn't use anything other than kiln dried 2 x 4's. But the original question was which to use, and my original answer still rings true, both will work.

I am not sure which type of pressure treated lumber they use in Illinois, but in California it has been changed from green (arsnic) to brown (which uses copper azole as the main presservative). Splinters are still going to suck, but are far less dangerous than the old stuff.

There will be a differance in strength, but a 55 gallon aquarium does not carry enough weight to cause concern.

Anyway, Liquid134 you have several options, let us know which one you choose and post some photos!!

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80 gallon cichlid
40 gallon Angelfish
29 gallon cylindricus
20 gallon plant
60 gallon - 1 jack dempsey
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